Emerging and Young Adulthood: Multiple Perspectives, Diverse Narratives

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Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 17, 2008 - Social Science - 176 pages
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This volume reaches beyond facile "Gen X" and "quarterlife crisis" constructs to reveal the many diverse voices of young adults – their attitudes toward life, work, relationships, peers, and identities – and incorporates the diverse perspectives of parents and employers. It is a must-have resource for developmental, school, and counseling psychologists and therapists as well as for researchers and graduate-level students.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Identity
13
Cultural Considerations and Emerging and Young Adulthood
29
Voices of Emerging and Young Adults In Pursuit of a Career Path
43
Voices of Emerging and Young Adults From the Professional to the Personal
59
The Tyranny of Choice A ReExamination of the Prevailing Narrative
81
Parental Voices Adjustment Reactions to Childrens Adult Life
97
Voices of Employers Overlapping and Disparate Views
111
Running on Empty Running on Full Summary and Synthesis
129
Methods
149
Emerging and Young Adult Questionnaire
159
Parent Questionnaire
163
Employer Questionnaire
167
Index
169
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About the author (2008)

Varda Konstam, Ph.d., a Professor at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, in the Counseling and School Psychology Department, brings range and depth in understanding the developmental period of young adults in their 20s. Her extensive teaching, research, and clinical background bring focus to the diverse perspective of the major stakeholders – parents, employers, and individuals – who are negotiating their 20s as well as those individuals who have newly emerged from this decade. Dr. Konstam weaves a tapestry that is grounded in research, nuanced in capturing the voices of multiple stakeholders, and provides a guide for understanding and navigating new patterns of behavior associated with people in their 20s.

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