Emi and the Rhino Scientist

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2007 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 57 pages
9 Reviews
Terri Roth trudges through the thick, dark Sumatran jungle. She’s looking for a rhinoceros that’s been seen in the area. It’s a rare Sumatran rhino, the world’s smallest rhino and one of the most endangered mammals on the planet.Suddenly she spots a young female rhino through the tangle of ferns and trees. The stocky animal is covered in reddish hair, and her snout sports two stubby horns. The rhino walks right up to Terri. The scientist slowly reaches out her hand and touches the rhino’s big nose. The wild rhino’s curiosity and friendliness remind Terri of Emi, the female Sumatran rhino that lives at the Cincinnati Zoo where Terri works. Terri is working with Emi to help save Sumatran rhinos from extinction—one calf at a time.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kris0812 - LibraryThing

In this book we meet Terri Roth, who has been trying to help Emi the rhino give birth to a baby. Emi had five miscarriages before giving birth to Andalas, the new baby rhinoceros. During the "living ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Krguarisco - LibraryThing

Very refreshing to see a book about female scientist. This book follows a biologist in the field as she tries to help endangered rhinos reproduce. She is finally successful with her research and experiments that a bay rhino is born with the help of in vitro fertilization. Read full review

Contents

AN INSIDE LOOK I
7
PUTTING THE PIECES TOGETHER
22
SAVING RHINOS WITH SCIENCE
29
ANDALAS GROWS UP
40
Whats Everyone Up to Now?
49
Words to Know
55
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Mary Kay Carson and Tom Uhlman are married and live with their dog Ruby in a century-old house surrounded by deer, hawks, woodchucks, songbirds, and other creatures in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Tom Uhlman has been a freelance photographer for 25 years. He photographs lots of news and sporting events, but enjoys shooting pictures of wildlife and the natural world most of all. Visiting some of the most famous volcanos in the world and meeting the people who study them was a special treat. Tom's photographs can also be seen in upcoming Scientists in the Field book Park Scientists, and previously in Emi and the Rhino Scientist and The Bat Scientists

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