Emily Post's Etiquette 17th Edition

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Harper Collins, Mar 17, 2009 - Reference - 896 pages
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For the first time in its history, this American classic has been completely rewritten. Peggy Post gives us etiquette for today's times. Read by millions since the first edition was published in 1922, Emily Post—the most trusted name in etiquette—has always been there to help people navigate every conceivable social situation. The tradition continues with this 100 percent revised and updated edition, which covers the formal, the traditional, the contemporary, and the casual.

Based on thousands of reader questions, surveys conducted on the Emily Post Institute and Good Housekeeping Web sites, and Peggy's travels across the country, the book shows how to handle the new, difficult, unusual, and everyday situations we all encounter. The definition of etiquette—a code of behavior based on thoughtfulness—has not changed since Emily's day. The etiquette guidelines we use to smooth the way change all the time.

This new edition resolves hundreds of our key etiquette concerns: dealing with rudeness, netiquette, noxious neighbors, road rage, family harmony, on-line dating, cell phone courtesy, raising respectful children and teens, and travel etiquette in the post-9/11 world...to name just a few.

Emily Post's Etiquette, 17th Edition also remains the definitive source for timeless advice on entertaining, social protocol, table manners, guidelines for religious ceremonies, expressing condolences, introductions, how to be a good houseguest and host, invitations, correspondence, planning a wedding, giving a toast, and sportsmanship.

Peggy Post's advice gives us the confidence of knowing we're doing the right thing so we can relax and enjoy the moment and move more easily through our world. Emily Post's Etiquette, 17th Edition will be the resource of choice for years to come.

 

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Contents

A Note to Readers xiii
What etiquette is and isnt and the pillars on which it is built Greetings
Chapter Three When Out and About
Chapter Four Dealing with Rudeness
Chapter Five Dress and Grooming
Part
Chapter Seven Separation and Divorce 79
Chapter Eight Todays Families 89
Chapter Twentyfive The Dinner Party 433
Chapter Twentysix Hosts and Houseguests 460
Chapter Twentyseven Parties Galore 471
Dos and donts for baby showers comingofage celebrations and birthday
Chapter Thirty Giving and Receiving Gifts 514
Chapter Thirtyone Grieving and Condolences 529
Chapter Thirtytwo Attending Religious Services 547
Part Seven

Chapter Nine The Thoughtful Family Member 103
Chapter Ten The Good Neighbor 115
Chapter Eleven Illnesses and Disabilities 131
Getting children off on the right and mannerly foot Greetings introductions
Chapter Fourteen Table and Party Manners 181
Chapter Fifteen Young Communicators 195
Chapter Sixteen Teen Dates and Special Occasions 209
Part Four
Chapter Eighteen Invitations and Announcements 247
Chapter Nineteen The Good Conversationalist 280
Chapter Twenty Email Etcetera 296
Chapter Twentyone Telephone Manners 306
Chapter Twentytwo Names Titles and Official Protocol 321
Part Five
The truth about table manners Eating difficult foods with ease Keeping
Making the engagement official Keeping wedding plans from spinning out
Chapter Thirtyeight Wedding Gifts 666
Chapter Thirtynine Your Day 680
Chapter Forty A Guide for Wedding Guests 705
Chapter Fortyone Remarriage 720
Chapter Fortytwo New Times New Traditions 732
Part Eight
Chapter Fortyfour The Social Side 759
The new airplane etiquette Rules of the road Smooth sailing on cruises
Chapter Fortysix The Finer Points of Tipping 800
Chapter Fortyseven Performances in Public Places 818
Chapter Fortyeight Sports and Recreation 830
Index 849
xii
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Peggy Post, Emily Post’s great-granddaughter-in-law, is a director of The Emily Post Institute and the author of more than a dozen books. Peggy writes a monthly column in Good Housekeeping and an online wedding etiquette column for the New York Times.

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