Empire and Power in the Reign of Süleyman: Narrating the Sixteenth-Century Ottoman World

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 29, 2013 - History - 290 pages
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Kaya Şahin's book offers a revisionist reading of Ottoman history during the reign of Süleyman the Magnificent (1520-1566). By examining the life and works of a bureaucrat, Celalzade Mustafa, Şahin moves beyond traditional, teleological approaches and argues that the empire was built as part of the Eurasian momentum of empire building, and demonstrates the imperial vision of sixteenth-century Ottomans. This unique study shows that, in contrast with many Eurocentric views, the Ottomans were active players in European politics, with an imperial culture in direct competition with that of the Habsburgs and the Safavids. Indeed, this book explains Ottoman empire building with reference to the larger Eurasian context, from Tudor England to Mughal India, contextualizing such issues as state formation, imperial policy, and empire building in the period more generally. Şahin's work also devotes significant attention to the often-ignored religious dimension of the Ottoman-Safavid struggle, showing how the rivalry redefined Sunni and Shiite Islam, laying the foundations for today's religious tensions.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
CELALZADE MUSTAFA AND THE NEW OTTOMAN
13
The Empire and Its Chancellor 15341553
88
A Grand Vizier Dies a Chancellor Rises
100
The Hungarian Question Comes Back with a Vengeance
109
The Alqas Mirza Affair
116
Toward the End 15531567
123
Mutual Recognition or War Weariness?
131
The Epitome
139
The End of the Siileymanic Era
146
EMPIRE
157
Institutionalization and Bureaucratic
214
Conclusion
243
Bibliography
253
Index
281
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Kaya Şahin is Assistant Professor of History at Indiana University, Bloomington. His research and writing have been supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Newberry Library, and the Social Science Research Council.

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