Empire's Ally: Canada and the War in Afghanistan

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Jerome Klassen, Greg Albo
University of Toronto Press, 2013 - History - 447 pages
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The war in Afghanistan has been a major policy commitment and central undertaking of the Canadian state since 2001: Canada has been a leading force in the war, and has spent hundreds of millions of dollars on aid and reconstruction. After a decade of conflict, however, there is considerable debate about the efficacy of the mission, as well as calls to reassess Canada's role in the conflict. An authoritative and strongly analytical work, Empire's Ally provides a much-needed critical investigation into one of the most polarizing events of our time.

This collection draws on new primary evidence – including government documents, think tank and NGO reports, international media files, and interviews in Afghanistan – to provide context for Canadian foreign policy, to offer critical perspectives on the war itself, and to link the conflict to broader issues of political economy, international relations, and Canada's role on the world stage. Spanning academic and public debates, Empire's Ally opens a new line of argument on why the mission has entered a stage of crisis.

 

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Contents

Empire Afghanistan and Canadian
3
Afghanistan and Empire
43
The Political Economy of Intervention
74
The Empire of Capital and the Latest Inning
106
State Building Development
139
Economy of Canadian Militarism
181
of Intervention
211
Failed States and Canadas 3D Policy in Afghanistan
277
Development in Afghanistan
339
How Stories of Torture Define the Nation
367
Québec Solidaire and the Antiwar Movement
391
Movement in Canada
411
Contributors
439
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About the author (2013)

Jerome Klassen is a postdoctoral research fellow with the International Development Studies Program at Saint Mary's University.

Greg Albo is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at York University.

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