Employee Benefits in Medium and Large Private Establishments, 1991

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DIANE Publishing, May 1, 1994 - 140 pages
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The results of a large-scale survey that dealt with the incidence and detailed provisions of selected employee benefit plans in medium and large private establishments. Provides representative data for 36 million employees in private nonagricultural industries in the U.S. Covers both full- and part-time employees. Includes: parental leave, disability benefits, medical care, life insurance, pension plans, and much more. Over 120 statistical tables.
 

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Contents

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Page iii - Results of earlier surveys of this area are also available from BLS regional offices, the Division of Compensation Data Analysis and Planning, or at the BLS Internet site. Material in this bulletin is in the public domain and, with appropriate credit, may be reproduced without permission. This information will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: (202) 691-5200; Federal Relay Service: 1-800-877-8339.
Page 132 - Nonsampling errors can be attributed to many sources; eg, inability to obtain information about all cases in the sample, definitional difficulties, differences in the interpretation of questions, inability or unwillingness...
Page 127 - Participants are workers covered by a paid time off, insurance, or retirement plan. Employees subject to a minimum service requirement before they are eligible for benefit coverage are counted as participants even if they have not met the requirement at the time of the survey. If employees are required to pay part of the cost of a benefit, only those who elect the coverage and pay their share are counted as participants. Benefits for which the employee must pay the full premium are outside the scope...
Page 123 - Band of medium and large employers in a common trade or business, for example, savings and loan associations. The plan sponsored by the association is not negotiated with the employees. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Where applicable, dash indicates no employees in this category...
Page 132 - They are not tabulations based on data from all employees in small establishments within scope of the survey. Consequently, the data are subject to sampling and nonsampling errors. Sampling errors are the differences that can arise between results derived from a sample and those computed from observations of all units in the population being studied. When probability techniques are used to select a sample, as in the Employee Benefits Survey, statistical measures...
Page 9 - Employees are either granted a specific number of days after completion of the indicated length of service, or accrue days during the next 12-month period. The total number of days are assumed available for use immediately upon completion of the described length-of-service interval. 2 Employees receiving vacation days, but none at 1 year of service, were included only for the service periods for which they receive vacations. 3 The average (mean) was essentially the same for longer lengths of NOTE:...
Page 83 - The amount of an early retirement pension is reduced because benefits begin at an early age, and the retiree is expected to receive plan payments over a longer period. Early retirement benefits are generally computed based on the normal retirement formula. The benefit is then reduced by a percentage (factor) for each year between the actual and normal retirement ages. If a plan's normal retirement age is 62, for example, and the reduction factor is 6 percent, a person retiring at age 59 would receive...
Page 132 - Nonsampling errors also affect survey results. They can be attributed to many sources: Inability to obtain information about all establishments in the sample; definitional difficulties; differences in the interpretation of questions; inability or unwillingness of respondents to provide correct information; mistakes in recording or coding the data; and other errors of collection, response, processing, coverage, and estimation for missing data. Computer edits of the data and professional review of...
Page 50 - Includes plans with overall benefit limitations, such as maximum dollar amounts and deductibles, where the coinsurance rate is 100 percent. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals Where applicable, dash indicates no employees in this category.
Page 53 - ... percent. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Where applicable, dash indicates no employees in this category, or data do not meet publication criteria.

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