Empowering Children through Art and Expression: Culturally Sensitive Ways of Healing Trauma and Grief

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Jessica Kingsley Publishers, Jun 15, 2007 - Psychology - 176 pages
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Empowering Children through Art and Expression examines the successful use of arts and expressive therapies with children, and in particular those whose lives have been disrupted by forced relocation with their families to a different culture or community. The book explores how children express and resolve unspoken feelings about traumatic experiences in play and other creative activities, based on their observations of peer support groups, outreach programs and through individuals' own accounts. The authors argue that such activities in a safe context can be both a means of expressing trauma and a coping strategy for children to overcome it. This book combines personal and professional perspectives, using case examples as well as the authors' own childhood experiences, to demonstrate practical strategies for use with children, from drama and storytelling to sculpting with clay. It also equips the reader with knowledge of the theory behind these intervention techniques. This book will be a valuable resource for professionals working with traumatized children who have experienced loss, grief, relocation and other kinds of trauma.
 

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Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
7
PREFACE
8
Introduction
11
CHAPTER 1 The Importance of Myth Reflection and Cultural Sensitivity
26
Chapter 2 The Center for Grieving Children
47
Chapter 3 Children Our Greatest Teachers
56
Chapter 4 Building Trust
67
Chapter 5 Anger Fear and Conflict
87
Chapter 7 Realities Become More Visible
107
Chapter 8 Letting Go
122
Chapter 9 Hope
134
Chapter 10 The Authors Autobiographical Exploration of the Importance of Myth in Creating Personal Reality
145
Chapter 11 Conclusion
161
SUBJECT INDEX
170
AUTHOR INDEX
174
BACK COVER
177

Inner and Outer Realities
98

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Page 15 - Gretel lay down in them, and thought they were in heaven. The old woman had only pretended to be so kind; she was in reality a wicked witch, who lay in wait for children, and had only built the little house of bread in order to entice them there.
Page 14 - And as on that account she always looked dusty and dirty, they called her Cinderella. It happened that the father was once going to the fair, and he asked his two step-daughters what he should bring back for them. "Beautiful dresses," said one, "pearls and jewels,

About the author (2007)

Bruce St Thomas has an Ed.D in Counselling Psychology from the University of Maine at Orono, along with over 30 years of clinical consultation experience with children, families, therapeutic groups, community programs and educational organizations. He has published numerous articles, programs and audiotapes on guided imagery, therapeutic work with trauma and art therapy. Paul Johnson has a DSW and is a licensed clinical social worker in the State of Maine. He is an Associate Professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Southern Maine. He has over 20 years' experience in social work in both the UK and the US. He has published a number of articles on children, trauma and loss.

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