Emptiness Yoga: The Tibetan Middle Way

Front Cover
Motilal Banarsidass Publishe, 1997 - Buddhism - 510 pages
Emptiness Yoga is an absorbing and highly readable presentation of the highest development in Buddhist insight. Professor Jeffery Hopkins--considered by many to be the foremost contemporary Western authority on Tibetan Buddhism--presents an in-depth, lively exposition of the methods of realization of the Middle Way Consequence School (Prasangika Madhyamika). His personal and accessible presentation is based on a famous work by Jang-gya Rol-bay-dorjay (lcang skya rol pa `i rdo rje, 1717-86) which was used as a primary text in Tibet`s largest monasteries. A translation of this text is included as well as the Tibetan text itself. The many reasonings used to analyze persons and phenomena and to establish their true mode of existence are presented in the context of meditative practice. This exposition includes a masterful treatment of the compatibility in thought and experience of emptiness and dependent-arising. Emptiness Yoga will be greatly appreciated by both beginners and advanced students for its immediacy, profundity, and precision.
 

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Contents

Preface
9
Technical Note
12
Janggyas Biography
15
Consequentialists
36
Self
55
False Appearance
68
Own Thing
82
Validity
95
Bringing the Reasoning to Life
249
As a Basis of Emptiness
263
Compatibility of Emptiness and Nominal Existence
282
DependentArising
303
The Centrality of DependentArising
330
Janggyas Text Without
355
Self
364
Purpose of Reasoning
373

Withdrawal Is Not Sufficient
108
Reasoned Refutation
123
The Main Reasonings
148
Can Something Give Birth to Itself
156
Does a Plant Grow?
172
Inducing Realization
187
Other Reasonings
204
Background
209
A Chariot
224
Refuting a Self of Phenomena
383
Refuting a Self of Persons
391
DependentArising
409
Page Correlations Tibetan to English
429
Notes 511
448
Index
486
The Middle Way Consequence School
512
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Jeffrey Hopkins is Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia.

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