En diálogo, Volume 1

Front Cover
Siglo XXI, 2005 - Biography & Autobiography - 326 pages
0 Reviews
En los últimos años de su vida Jorge Luis Borges mantuvo inolvidables diálogos en los encuentros radiales con el escritor Osvaldo Ferrari. No fueron reportajes o entrevistas, sino estrictamente conversaciones nacidas del placer de tratar temas con los que ambos, a pesar de las diferencias de edad, tenían afinidades. Los tomos En diálogo I y En diálogo II recogen estas conversaciones tan elogiadas a través de los años.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Recuerdos de bibliotecas reñideros y poemas raros
192
Evocación de Kipling
198
Borges y la memoria
203
Los grupos Florida Boedo y la revista Sur
208
Sobre los diálogos
213
Sobre la poesía gauchesca
219
Sonetos revelaciones viajes y países
224
La ética y la cultura
230
El culto de los libros
265
Pasado presente y futuro de la Argentina
271
Sobre la filosofía
276
Su madre Leonor Acevedo Suárez
282
Los prólogos
288
Flaubert
292
Sobre el Uruguay
299
La inteligencia poética
305

Dos viajes alJapón
234
Evaristo Carriego milonga y tango
238
Mitología escandinava y épica anglosajona
242
Sobre Borges yAlonso Quijano
248
Sócrates
254
Sobre los Estados Unidos
259
Almafuerte
310
El budismo
316
El sabor de lo épico
319
0303OSOÜOÜIQIQIQIQIQIQIQIQIQIDibDbbHbbHH
326
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1899, Jorge Borges was educated by an English governess and later studied in Europe. He returned to Buenos Aires in 1921, where he helped to found several avant-garde literary periodicals. In 1955, after the fall of Juan Peron, whom he vigorously opposed, he was appointed director of the Argentine National Library. With Samuel Beckett he was awarded the $10,000 International Publishers Prize in 1961, which helped to establish him as one of the most prominent writers in the world. Borges regularly taught and lectured throughout the United States and Europe. His ideas have been a profound influence on writers throughout the Western world and on the most recent developments in literary and critical theory. A prolific writer of essays, short stories, and plays, Borges's concerns are perhaps clearest in his stories. He regarded people's endeavors to understand an incomprehensible world as fiction; hence, his fiction is metaphysical and based on what he called an esthetics of the intellect. Some critics have called him a mystic of the intellect. Dreamtigers (1960) is considered a masterpiece. A central image in Borges's work is the labyrinth, a mental and poetic construct, that he considered a universe in miniature, which human beings build and therefore believe they control but which nevertheless traps them. In spite of Borges's belief that people cannot understand the chaotic world, he continually attempted to do so in his writing. Much of his work deals with people's efforts to find the center of the labyrinth, symbolic of achieving understanding of their place in a mysterious universe. In such later works as The Gold of the Tigers, Borges wrote of his lifelong descent into blindness and how it affected his perceptions of the world and himself as a writer. Borges died in Geneva in 1986.

Bibliographic information