Encyclopaedia Perthensis; or, Universal dictionary of Knowledge

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Page 331 - ... upon which we walked •were often flat, having neither concavity nor convexity : the larger number however were concave, though...
Page 380 - ... connected ; and in this manner the operation of the engine may be continued for ever. " The injection water is continually running into the eduction-pipe, because condensation is continually going on, and therefore there is a continual atmospheric pressure to produce a jet. The air which is disengaged from the water, or enters by leaks, is evacuated only during the rise of the piston of the air-pump K. " It is evident that this form of the engine, by...
Page 333 - Thou must be patient; we came crying hither. Thou know'st, the first time that we smell the air, We wawl, and cry: — I will preach to thee; mark me. Glo. Alack, alack the day ! Lear. When we are born, we cry, that we are come To this great stage of fools...
Page 236 - But God has not been so sparing to men to make them barely two-legged creatures, and left it to Aristotle to make them rational...
Page 331 - ... as have been broken off, which extends as far under water as the eye can reach. Here the forms of the pillars -are apparent : these are of three, four, five, six, and seven sides, but the numbers of five and six are by much the most prevalent.
Page 102 - NOT to admire, is all the art I know, To make men happy, and to keep them so.
Page 348 - They are held before the lord warden and his substitutes, in virtue of a privilege granted to the workers in the tin mines there, to sue and be sued only in their own...
Page 331 - ... in among the mafs of pillars, carrying here and there fmall threads of fpar. Though they were broken and cracked through and through in all directions, yet their perpendicular figures might eafily be traced : from whence it is eafy to infer, that whatever the accident might have been, that caufed the diflocation, it happened after the formation of the pillars. " From hence proceeding along...
Page 106 - Another, who had a great genius for tragedy, following the fury of his natural temper, made every man and woman too, in his plays, stark raging mad ; there was not a sober person to be had for love or money...
Page 331 - NW you meet with the higheft ranges of pillars, the magnificent appearance of which is part all defcription : here they are bare to their very bafis, and the ftratum below them is alfo vifible : in a fhort time it rifes many feet above the water, and^ gives an opportunity of examining its quality. Its...

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