Engaging Modernity: Methods and Cases for Studying African Independent Churches in South Africa

Front Cover
Dawid Venter
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004 - Social Science - 240 pages

The key theme addressed by all the contributors to this book is the relationship between South Africa's indigenous churches (AICs) to modernity. The key question asked by each of the contributors is to what extent, if any, do AICs serve as bridges to tradition or as facilitators for modernizing practices? Although the researchers do not agree on the answer to this question--some argue for the return to tradition, others argue for the facilitation perspective--they do provide provocative and timely insights for prospective researchers interested in exploring concepts and methodologies for understanding modernity and modernization. Based on a number of case studies of AICs in South Africa, this book will also be of great interest to scholars of comparative religion and the role churches play in negotiating the complex terrains of politics, society, and economy in this era of globalization.

 

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Contents

Concepts and Theories in the Study of African Independent Churches
13
African Independent Churches and Modernity
45
A COMMUNITY PERSPECTIVE
59
Combining Ethnographic and Survey Methods for a Local Comparative Study of African Independent Churches
61
African Independent Churches and Economic Development in Edendale
81
A NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE
105
A Methodology for a National Comparative Study of African Independent Churches
107
The Reinvention of Tradition in African Independent Churches as a Means to Engage Modernity
127
Globalization World System and African Independent Churches in the Transkei
171
EPILOGUE
193
The Future of African Independent Churches in South Africa
195
Religious Affiliation 2001
213
Glossary
215
Additional Resources
223
Index
227
About the Contributors

A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
147
Applying a World System Perspective to a Literature Study of African Independent Churches
149

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About the author (2004)

DAWID J. VENTER is Adjunct Associate Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology at the University of Missouri, St. Louis. An assistant editor of the official South African journal of sociology, Venter has concentrated on the intersections of religion, politics, and the global system. He holds a Ph.D in religion (l994) and a Ph.D in sociology (l999), both from the University of Stellenbosch.

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