Engine tests: embracing the results of over one hundred feed-water tests and other investigations on various kinds of steam engines, conducted by the author

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Van Nostrand, 1900 - Steam-engines - 339 pages
 

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Page 33 - ... so far as concerned in attaining the objects. It is well to supplement these determinations with a sketch or sketches showing the general features and arrangement of the different parts of the plant. To measure the clearance by actual test, the engine is carefully set on the center, with the piston at the end where the measurement is to be taken. Assuming, for example, a Corliss engine, the best method to pursue is to remove the steam valve so as to have access to the whole steam port, and then...
Page 34 - The only difficulty which arises in measuring the clearance in this way is that occurring when the exhaust valves and piston are not tight, so that, as the water is poured in, it flows away and is lost. If the leakage is serious, no satisfactory measurement can be made, and it is better to depend upon the volume calculated from the drawing. If not too serious, however, an allowance can be made by carefully observing the length of time consumed in pouring in the water; then, after a portion of the...
Page 13 - ... inches in diameter so as to allow quick emptying. Where large quantities of water are required, the barrel can be replaced by a hogshead, and two additional hogsheads can be joined together for the lower reservoir. When the •weighing hogshead is thus supplied through a 2...
Page 34 - ... temperature. The proportion required is the volume in cubic inches thus found, divided by the volume of the piston displacement, also in cubic inches, and the result expressed as a decimal. In this test care should be taken that no air is retained in the clearance space when it is filled with water.
Page 31 - To calculate the indicated horse-power, multiply the area of the piston in square inches by twice the length of the stroke in feet, and the product by the number of revolutions per minute. (This product is known as the ''''piston displacement...
Page 34 - ... water, which is poured into the open port through a funnel. The water is drawn from a receptacle containing a sufficient quantity which has previously been measured. When the whole space , including the port, is completely filled, the quantity left is measured, and the difference shows the amount which has been poured in. The measurement can be most easily made by weighing the water and the corresponding volume determined by calculation, making proper allowance for its temperature.
Page 34 - ... flows away and is lost. If the leakage is serious, no satisfactory measurement can be made, and it is better to depend upon the volume calculated from the drawing. If not too serious, however, an allowance can be made by observing the length of time consumed in pouring in the water; then, after a portion of the water has leaked out, fill up the space again, taking the time and measuring the quantity thus added, determining in this way the rate of leakage. Data will thus be obtained for the desired...
Page 32 - E the proportion of clearance; all of which are determinable from the indicator diagram. We represents the weight of one cubic foot of steam at the cut-off or release pressure; and Wh the weight of one cubic foot of steam at the compression pressure. 13. Standards of Economy and Efficiency. — The standard expression for engine economy, as already stated, is the hourly consumption of heat units divided by the indicated horse power or the brake horse power. The standard expression for efficiency...
Page 13 - ... emptied into a reservoir beneath, from which the pump is supplied. For measuring small quantities of water, about 6,000 pounds per hour, the most convenient apparatus consists of a small hogshead connected to the suction pipe of the pump or injector and an ordinary oil barrel placed on a platform scale. The barrel is filled by means of a cold-water pipe leading from the source of supply.
Page 13 - Ibs. of water per hour. For still larger capacity it is desirable to use rectangular tanks made for the purpose, and have the weighing-tank arranged so that the ends overhang the scales and the reservoir below, the outlet valve, consisting of a flap valve, covering an opening in the bottom 6" or 8

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