Engineering Databases: Connecting Islands of Automation Through Databases

Front Cover
Jose L. Encarnacao, Peter C. Lockemann
Springer Science & Business Media, May 7, 1990 - Computers - 229 pages
Automation is nothing new to industry. It has a long tradition on the factory floor, where its constant objective has been to increase the productivity of manufacturing processes. Only with the advent of computers could the focus of automation widen to include administrative and information-handling tasks. More recently, automation has been extended to the more intellectual tasks of production planning and control, material and resource planning, engineering design, and quality control. New challenges arise in the form of flexible manu facturing, assembly automation, and automated floor vehicles, to name just a few. The sheer complexity of the problems as well as the state of the art has led scientists and engineers to concentrate on issues that could easily be isolated. For example, it was much simpler to build CAD systems whose sole objective was to ease the task of drawing, rather than to worry at the same time about how the design results could be interfaced with the manufacturing or assembly processes. It was less problematic to gather statistics from quality control and to print reports than to react immediately to first hints of irregularities by inter facing with the designers or manufacturing control, or, even better, by auto matically diagnosing the causes from the design and planning data. A heav- though perhaps unavoidable - price must today be paid whenever one tries to assemble these isolated solutions into a larger, integrated system.
 

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Contents

1 Significance of Engineering Databases
1
112 Oceans of Information
2
113 Bridging the Islands
7
12 The Solution
8
Computer Integrated Enterprise
10
13 The Architecture of an Engineering Database System
14
132 Hybrid Solutions
15
14 Organizational Procedures
17
243 Other Issues
134
244 Further Reading
136
3 Utilization of Engineering Databases
139
321 Principles of Schema Definition
140
322 Typical Situations
143
323 Objects and Interdependencies
144
3232 Object Interdependencies
146
3233 Library and Object Overlapping Information
149

142 Management Aspects
18
15 Further Reading
19
2 Database Technology
21
212 Operation of Database Systems
23
213 Outline of the Chapter
28
214 A Running Example
29
Current Status
31
2212 The Network Data Model
37
2213 The Relational Data Model
46
222 Database System Interfaces
55
2222 The Hierarchical Data Model
56
2223 The Network Data Model
60
2224 The Relational Data Model
66
223 Database Consistency
69
2232 Expressing Consistency Constraints
72
224 Concurrency
74
225 Database Recovery
80
226 Transaction Management
86
227 Miscellaneous Services
88
2272 Mass Data Input and Output
90
228 System Organization and Environment
91
2282 Hardware and Operating System Aspects
94
229 Performance Control
96
2210 Further Reading
98
A New Focus
99
232 Data Model
100
233 Database System Interface
102
234 Database Consistency
103
235 Concurrency
105
237 Transaction Management
106
239 System Organization
108
2310 Performance Control
109
Taking Care of the New Focus
110
242 Data Models
111
2422 Object Identification
118
2423 Objects and Relationships
119
2424 Attributes
129
2425 ObjectOriented Database Systems
133
33 Version Management
150
332 Modeling of Version Interrelations
152
333 Configuration Modeling Based on Version Management
154
334 Support of Design Control
155
335 Version and Configuration Management Based on DAMOKLES
156
34 Generating and Entering Data
159
341 Criteria for Characterizing the Generation Process
160
342 Commercial Applications
161
343 Engineering Applications
162
344 Example
165
35 Archiving of Database Objects
171
351 General Requirements for an Archiving Mechanism in a Database System
172
353 Archiving Versions
175
354 Archiving Configurations
176
36 Data Interchange
178
362 Data Interchange in the Different Levels of System Integration
179
363 Kind and Structure of Interchange Data
180
EDIF
181
37 Application Programming
184
372 Use of Database Functions for Application Programming
185
38 Further Reading
188
4 Case Studies
189
412 Representation of Design Information in Relational Databases
191
4122 Implementing an Operational Interface on Top of the Relational Database System ORACLE
194
413 EDIFOriented Design Systems
203
4131 EDIFOriented Database Schemes
204
42 Software Engineering
208
4212 A System Engineering Environment
210
422 The PRODAT Object Model
211
4221 Simple Objects
212
4222 Structured Objects and Relationships
213
4223 Completeness of Objects
215
4225 Versions
217
4226 Configurations
218
423 A Tool Using PRODAT The Object Editor
219
424 PRODAT as Interface to DAMOKLES in Software Engineering
224
43 Further Reading
228
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