Engineering the City: How Infrastructure Works

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Chicago Review Press, Oct 1, 2000 - Architecture - 144 pages
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How does a city obtain water, gas, and electricity? Where do these services come from? How are they transported? The answer is infrastructure, or the inner, and sometimes invisible, workings of the city. Roads, railroads, bridges, telephone wires, and power lines are visible elements of the infrastructure; sewers, plumbing pipes, wires, tunnels, cables, and sometimes rails are usually buried underground or hidden behind walls. "Engineering the City" tells the fascinating story of infrastructure as it developed through history along with the growth of cities. Experiments, games, and construction diagrams show how these structures are built, how they work, and how they affect the environment of the city and the land outside it.
 

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Contents

1 WATER WATER EVERYWHERE
1
2 WATER TRANSPORTATION
13
3 IRRIGATION
25
4 RED BLUE AND BLACK HIGHWAYS
33
5 THE IRON HORSE
41
6 WHY DO BRIDGES COME IN SO MANY SHAPES?
57
7 WIRES WIRES EVERYWHERE
77
8 WHAT HAPPENS WHEN I FLUSH THE TOILET?
89
9 WHERE DOES ALL THE GARBAGE GO?
97
10 POLLUTION
107
GLOSSARY
119
BIBLIOGRAPHY
126
INDEX
127
Also Available
131
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Matthys Levy is chairman-emeritus of Weidlinger Associates Structural Engineers. His previous books include the best-selling Why Buildings Fall Down and Why the Earth Quakes.

Richard Panchyk is the author of Archaeology for Kids and the coauthor of Engineering the City. Both of his grandfathers and three of his great-uncles were soldiers in World War II. He lives on Long Island in New York.

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