Engines: An Introduction

Couverture
Cambridge University Press, 28 juin 1999 - 248 pages
The internal combustion engine that powers the modern automobile has changed very little from its initial design of some eighty years ago. Unlike many high tech advances, engine design still depends on an understanding of basic fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. This text offers a fresh approach to the study of engines, with an emphasis on design and on fluid dynamics. Professor Lumley, a renowned fluid dynamicist, provides a lucid explanation of how air and fuel are mixed, how they get into the engine, what happens to them there, and how they get out again. Particular attention is given to the complex issue of pollution. Every chapter includes numerous illustrations and examples and concludes with homework problems. Examples are taken from the early days of engine design, as well as the latest designs, such as stratified charge gasoline direct injection engines. It is intended that the text be used in conjunction with the Stanford Engine Simulation Program (ESP). This user-friendly, interactive software tool answers a significant need not addressed by other texts on engines. Aimed at undergraduate and first-year graduate students, the book will also appeal to hobbyists and car buffs who will appreciate the wealth of illustrations of classic, racing, and modern engines.
 

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Table des matières

THERMODYNAMIC CONSIDERATIONS
1
12 Efficiencies
5
13 A More Realistic Cycle
7
14 Knocking
12
15 Mean Effective Pressures
15
153 Indicated Mean Effective Pressure
17
17 Specific Power
18
18 StrokeBore Ratio
19
42 Total Engine Friction
119
43 Attribution of Friction Losses
122
44 Hydrodynamic Lubrication
125
45 Mechanical Efficiency
127
46 Inertial Loading
129
47 The Piston Ring
130
48 Problems
132
FLOW IN THE CYLINDER
134

19 Power Equation
24
110 Influence on Design
26
111 Bmep Again
27
12 Some More Thermodynamics
29
1124 STAIMJAN ESPJAN and ESP
31
BREATHING EXERCISES
33
23 The Discharge Coefficient
35
24 The Flow Coefficient
37
25 The Mach Index and Volumetric Efficiency
38
26 Partial Throttle
41
27 The XK Engine
42
28 Combustion Chamber Shape
44
29 Valve Actuation
48
210 Valve Timing
54
211 Variable Valve Timing
59
212 Manifold Tuning
66
213 Folding the Manifold
78
214 SuperchargingTurbocharging
80
215 Intercoolers
89
216 Problems
92
ENGINE COOLING
95
32 Valve Seat Recession
97
33 Heat Transfer in the Cylinder
100
335 Conclusions Regarding Temperatures
106
35 The Exhaust Valve
111
36 Ceramic Coatings
114
37 Problems
116
ENGINE FRICTION LOSSES
118
52 Phases of the Flow
136
53 Averaging
137
54 A Word About Turbulence
142
55 Turbulence Induced by the Inlet Jet
145
56 Inducing Swirl and Tumble
148
57 Effect of Compression
155
58 Charge Stratification
161
59 Squish
163
511 Lean Burn
170
512 Gasoline DirectInjection Engines
174
5121 Mitsubishi GDI Engine
181
OVERALL ENGINE PERFORMANCE
185
63 Transient Response
189
95 Problems
193
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
194
73 Balance and Vibration
201
74 The InLine Four
203
743 Balance Shafts
205
76 Problems
208
THE STANFORD ESP
210
82 Outline of the Model
211
83 Model Details
213
84 ESP Manifold Analysis
222
85 Program Status
236
Bibliography
237
Index
243
Droits d'auteur

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 240 - EFFECT OF INLET- VALVE DESIGN, SIZE, AND LIFT ON THE AIR CAPACITY AND OUTPUT OF A FOUR-STROKE ENGINE, James C.
Page 241 - Reuss, DL, Kuo, T., Khalighi, B., Haworth, D., and Rosalik, M. (1995), "Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in a High-Swirl Engine Used for Evaluation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Calculations/

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