England's Neglect of Science

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Unwin, 1900 - Science - 113 pages
 

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Page 79 - All offences under this Act shall be prosecuted, and all fines under this Act shall be recovered, on summary conviction before a court of summary jurisdiction in manner provided by the Summary Jurisdiction Acts.
Page 21 - ... development now going on in the world. Again, it is the fault of our methods of education that all our great men, our most important, most brilliant, best educated men ; our poets and novelists, our legislators and lawyers, our soldiers and sailors, our great manufacturers and merchants, our clergymen and schoolmasters, should remain so ignorant of physical science, the application of which by a few men not ignorant is transforming all the conditions of civilisation.
Page 28 - One thing that seems to be quite exasperating is that all the most important, the most brilliant, the most expensively educated people in England ; our poets and novelists; our legislators and lawyers ; our soldiers and sailors ; our great manufacturers and merchants; our clergymen and schoolmasters ; are quite ignorant of...
Page 14 - I venture on no prophecy, therefore, because it might harden your hearts. Much of the evil we suffer from is due to our average young men being pitchforked into works where they get no instruction, as soon as they leave school. If ordinary school education were worth the name, and if schoolmasters could be brought to...
Page 4 - Every case brought before a barrister requires the exercise of all his past experience. In every case a profession implies the necessity for the exercise of all one's past experience ; because the work one has to do is never the same as any work 1 I understand also that the great unions of manufacturers in Germany are about to make facilities for giving a year of real factory work to the Polytechnic students, thus perfecting the German system. In Japan we found great success in requiring students...
Page 79 - Power to vestries of neighbouring parishes to combine. — (1) Where this Act is adopted for any two or more neighbouring parishes, the vestries of those parishes may by agreement combine for any period in carrying this Act into execution, and the expenses of carrying this Act into execution shall be defrayed by the parishes in such proportions as may be agreed on by the vestries.
Page 52 - Measurement of angles in degrees and radians. The definitions of the sine, cosine, and tangent of an angle ; determination of their values by graphical methods ; setting out of angles by means of a protractor when they are given in degrees or radians, also when the value of the sine, cosine, or tangent is given. Use of tables of sines, cosines, and tangents. The solution of a rightangled triangle by calculation, and by drawing to scale. The construction of any triangle from given data ; determination...
Page 7 - ... this easy calculation is not made easier still, who prefer to make arithmetical guesses rather than exact calculation, because perhaps we like to see a little uncertainty introduced into the problem to make it more like a problem in civil engineering. I want members to see clearly that as times go on, as our electrical engineering work gets more and more cut and dried, the man who loses the power to calculate, who loses his grip of the simple theory underlying our work, must sink more and more...
Page 6 - England it may be that we shall prefer to let apprentices have shorter factory hours than workmen, their masters being responsible for instruction being given in theory. one has ever done before. And when I say past experience, I really mean certain general principles which one has always in one's mind, principles derived from all that one has done or seen or read about. Electrical engineering is in a curious position. It owes its being altogether to scientific men, to the laboratory and deskwork...
Page 90 - ... do so much. It is taken in because a child has much faith. In after years he will accept nothing without careful consideration. The machinery given to the brains of children is getting more and more complicated as time goes on ; but there is really no reason why it should not be taken in as easily, and used as readily, as were the axioms of childish education in ancient Chaldea.

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