English-Lahu Lexicon

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University of California Press, Jul 1, 2006 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 514 pages
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Lahu is an important minority language of Southeast Asia, belonging to the Lolo-Burmese subgroup of the Sino-Tibetan language family. It is spoken by over 500,000 people in China, Burma, Thailand, Laos and Vietnam.

This English-Lahu Lexicon (ELL) is a computer-aided but manually edited "reversal" of the author's monumental Lahu-English dictionary (The Dictionary of Lahu, UCPL #111, 1988, xxv + 1436 pp.).

English-Lahu Lexicon contains nearly 5400 head-entries and well over 10,000 carefully arranged subentries. Every Lahu expression is provided with a form-class designation to indicate its grammatical function. Eight useful Appendices (e.g. Plant and Animal Names) round out the volume's 450 pages.
 

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Contents

A
3
B
16
C
37
D
62
E
76
F
86
G
102
H
112
V
278
W
282
X
295
Y
296
Z
298
Introduction to Animal and Plant Appendices
299
Animal Names
301
B Scientific Name to Lahu
315

I
124
J
133
K
136
L
139
M
151
N
165
O
170
P
176
Q
199
R
201
S
216
T
256
U
274
C Lahu to English
325
D Lahu to Scientific Name
338
Plant Names
349
B Scientific Name to Lahu
365
C Lahu to English
376
D Lahu to Scientific Name
391
Elaborate Expressions
403
Proverbs
449
Classifiers
451
Particles and Other Functors
459
Time Weights and Measures
467
Select Bibliography
471
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page xii - months long, beginning in January with the selection and clearing of new fields, and ending with the final collection of raw opium in February of the following year.
Page xii - Since 1953, they have played a major role in the local administration of the Lancang Lahu Autonomous County,
Page xi - region bounded on the west by the Salween and on the east by the Mekong
Page xii - on stilts and made mostly of bamboo, with wood only for the main supports,
Page xi - than the average minority language, and is often used as a lingua franca by such
Page xi - The small Lahu community in Laos is now thought to comprise from 8000 to 10,000
Page xii - The Lahu in Thailand and Laos have all immigrated within the last hundred years

About the author (2006)

James A. Matisoff, Professor Emeritus of Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley, is one of the world's leading authorities on the languages of East and Southeast Asia, especially the Sino-Tibetan family. He is the author of numerous books, monographs, and articles, on topics synchronic and diachronic, grammatical, semantic, phonological, and lexicographical, including: The Loloish Tonal Split Revisited (1972), The Grammar of Lahu (1973/1982), Variational Semantics in Tibeto-Burman (1978), Blessings, Curses, Hopes and Fears: Psycho-ostensive Expressions in Yiddish (1979/2000), The Dictionary of Lahu (1988), Languages and Dialects of Tibeto-Burman (1996) and and Handbook of Proto-Tibeto-Burman (2003). He is the Principal Investigator of the Sino-Tibetan Etymological Dictionary and Thesaurus project, and Editor of the journal Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area. He is one of the founders of the annual International Conferences on Sino-Tibetan Languages and Linguistics. He has taught at Columbia and Berkeley, and has directed 28 doctoral dissertations in Asian and general linguistics.

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