English Literature & Printing from the 15th to the 18th Century, Volume 1

Front Cover
Maggs Bros., 1926 - Antiquarian booksellers - 840 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 184 - All the images of Nature were still present to him, and he drew them, not laboriously, but luckily; when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read Nature; he looked inwards, and found her there.
Page 374 - The Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments ' and other rites and ceremonies of the Church according to the use of the Church of England, together with the Psalter or Psalms of David, pointed as they are to be sung or said in churches ; and the form or manner of making, ordaining, and consecrating of bishops, priests, and deacons.
Page 346 - I loved the man, and do honour his memory (on this side Idolatry) as much as any). He was (indeed) honest, and of an open and free nature...
Page 728 - Complete Angler; or, The Contemplative Man's Recreation : being a Discourse of Rivers, Fishponds. Fish and Fishing, written by IZAAK WALTON ; and Instructions how to Angle for a Trout or Grayling in a clear Stream, by CHARLES COTTON.
Page 102 - A solemn League and Covenant for reformation and defence of religion, the honour and happiness of the King, and the peace and safety of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland.
Page 184 - ... you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind.
Page 346 - I remember, the players have often mentioned it as an honour to Shakespeare, that in his writing (whatsoever he penned) he never blotted out a line. My answer hath been, Would he had blotted a thousand.
Page 76 - BUTLER (Samuel). — Hudibras, in three parts, written in the Time of the Late Wars : Corrected and Amended. With Large Annotations and a Preface, by Zachary Grey, LLD Adorn'd with a new Set of Cuts (from the designs of Hogarth).
Page 70 - Chirologia: or the naturall language of the hand. Composed of the speaking motions, and discoursing gestures thereof.
Page 373 - AB, do declare my unfeigned assent and consent to all and everything contained and prescribed in and by the Book entitled the Book of Common Prayer, and Administration of the Sacraments and other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church, according to the use of the Church of England; together with the Psalter, or Psalms of David, printed as they are to be sung or said in Churches ; and the form or manner of making, ordaining, and consecrating of Bishops, Priests, and Deacons.

Bibliographic information