English Reading Lessons: To Serve as an Introduction to the Models of English Literature, for the Use of Colleges, Academies, and Schools

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Metropolitan Press, 1843 - English literature - 216 pages
 

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Page 123 - No vernal blooms their torpid rocks array, But winter lingering chills the lap of May; No zephyr fondly sues the mountain's breast, But meteors glare, and stormy glooms invest. Yet still, even here, content can spread a charm, Redress the clime, and all its rage disarm. Though poor the peasant's hut, his feasts tho...
Page 74 - The food often grows in one country, and the sauce in another. The fruits of Portugal are corrected by the products of Barbadoes ; the infusion of a China plant sweetened with the pith of an Indian cane.
Page 75 - For these reasons there are not more useful members in a commonwealth than merchants. They knit mankind together in a mutual intercourse of good offices, distribute the gifts of nature, find work for the poor, and wealth to the rich, and magnificence to the great.
Page 123 - No product here the barren hills afford, But man and steel, the soldier and his sword. No vernal blooms their torpid rocks array, But winter lingering chills the lap of May ; No zephyr fondly sues the mountain's breast, But meteors glare, and stormy glooms invest.
Page 74 - The single dress of a woman of quality is often the product of an hundred climates. The muff and the fan come together from the different ends of the earth. The scarf is sent from the torrid zone, and the tippet from beneath the pole. The brocade petticoat rises out of the mines of Peru, and the diamond necklace out of the bowels of Indostan.
Page 198 - I am found, said she, in the vale, and I illuminate the mountain : I cheer the cottager at his toil, and inspire the sage at his meditation. I mingle in the crowd of cities, and bless the hermit in his cell. I have a temple in every heart that owns my influence ; and to him that wishes for me I am already present. Science may raise...
Page 74 - Our ships are laden with the harvest of every climate : our tables are stored with spices, and oils, and wines : our rooms are filled with -o pyramids of china, and adorned with the workmanship of Japan : our morning's draught comes to us from the remotest corners of the earth : we repair our bodies by the drugs of America, and repose ourselves under Indian canopies.
Page 188 - Quench'd in dark clouds of slumber lie The terror of his beak, and lightnings of his eye.
Page 197 - The hill of Science. IK that season of the year, when the serenity of the sky, the various fruits which cover the ground, the discoloured foliage of the trees, and all the sweet, but fading graces of inspiring autumn, open the mind to benevolence, and dispose it for contemplation...
Page 188 - Man's feeble race what ills await: Labour, and Penury, the racks of Pain, Disease, and Sorrow's weeping train, And Death, sad refuge from the storms of Fate I The fond complaint, my song, disprove, And justify the laws of Jove.

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