... English Grammar ...: Compiled Under the Direction of the State Board of Education

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Printed at the State printing office, 1887 - English language - 292 pages
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Page 237 - As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him; but, as he was ambitious, I slew him.
Page 104 - SAINT AUGUSTINE ! well hast thou said, That of our vices we can frame A ladder, if we will but tread Beneath our feet each deed of shame ! All common things, each day's events, That with the hour begin and end, Our pleasures and our discontents, Are rounds by which we may ascend.
Page 238 - He spied far off, upon the ground, A something shining in the dark, And knew the glowworm by his spark ; So stooping down from hawthorn top, He thought to put him in his crop. The worm, aware of his intent, Harangued him thus, right eloquent — Did you admire my lamp...
Page 63 - He who ascends to mountain-tops, shall find The loftiest peaks most wrapt in clouds and snow; He who surpasses or subdues mankind, Must look down on the hate of those below. Though high above the sun of glory glow, And far beneath the earth and ocean spread, Round him are icy rocks, and loudly blow Contending tempests on his naked head, And thus reward the toils which to those summits led.
Page 113 - And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts; I am no orator, as Brutus is : But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man...
Page 237 - A NIGHTINGALE, that all day long Had cheer'd the village with his song, Nor yet at eve his note suspended, Nor yet when eventide was ended, • Began to feel, as well he might. The keen demands of appetite ; When, looking eagerly around, He spied far...
Page 238 - Stream on his deeds of love, that shunned the sight Of all but heaven, and in the book of fame The glorious record of his virtues write And hold it up to men, and bid them claim A palm like his, and catch from him the hallowed flame.
Page 105 - The heights by great men reached and kept, Were not attained by sudden flight, But they, while their companions slept, Were toiling upward in the night, Standing on what too long we bore With shoulders bent and downcast eyes, We may discern — unseen before — A path to higher destinies. Nor deem the irrevocable Past As wholly wasted — wholly vain — If rising on its wrecks, at last, To something nobler we attain.
Page 104 - We have not wings, we cannot soar: But we have feet to scale and climb, By slow degrees, by more and more, The cloudy summits of our time.
Page 181 - The stag at eve had drunk his fill, Where danced the moon on Monan's rill, And deep his midnight lair had made In lone Glenartney's hazel shade...

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