English Phonology: An Introduction

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Oct 15, 1992 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 333 pages
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This is an introduction to the phonology of present-day English. It deals principally with three varieties of English: "General American," Southern British "Received Pronunciation" and "Scottish Standard English." It offers a systematic and detailed discussion of the features shared by these major accents, and explains some major differences. Other varieties of English--Australian and New Zealand English, South African English and Hiberno-English--are also discussed briefly. Without focusing on current phonological theory and its evolution, the author demonstrates the importance of "theory," in whatever shape or form, in phonological argumentation. This textbook will be welcomed by all students of English language and linguistics.
 

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Contents

11 Organs and Processes 111 The initiation process
1
112 The phonation process
2
113 The oronasal process
3
114 The articulation process
6
12 Articulation in detail
7
places of articulation
9
122 Vowels
12
123 Manners of articulation
18
645 Appendices
147
65 The syllable template and phonotactics
151
651 Onset phonotactics
153
652 Rhyme phonotactics
159
vowels and consonants revisited
164
66 The syllabification of polysyllabic words
167
67 Segments Xpositions and syllables
174
Suggested reading to chapter 6
178

vowels revisited
22
13 Conclusion
26
Suggested reading to chapter 1
27
consonant phonemes 21 Phonetics and phonology or how many speech sounds does English have?
29
22 Phones phonemes and allophones
31
231 The basic inventory
33
232 Some regional modifications
36
233 Phonemic transcription and information
37
234 The phonetic content of phonemes
39
Suggested reading to chapter 2
42
31 A choice of reference accents
43
321 The Southern British Standard vowel phonemes
44
322 The vowel phonemes of Scottish Standard English
45
323 The vowel phonemes of General American
47
331 Pairs of phonemes
48
332 England
51
333 Scotland
53
334 The United States
58
341 Rhotic and nonrhotic accents
61
342 Scottish Standard English
63
343 General American
64
344 Received Pronunciation
65
schwa and some other vowels
66
36 Phonemic symbols and phonetic content
69
Some more accents of English
75
371 Australian New Zealand and South African English
76
Southern and Northern
82
Suggested reading to chapter 3
87
the classification of English vowel phonemes 41 The role of features in phonology
89
42 Phonological features and the basic vowel system
92
Sonorant Continuant and Consonantal
93
the feature Tense
95
423 Tenseness and length
99
Back High and Low
102
425 The feature Round and more on redundancy
107
Suggested reading to chapter 4
111
the consonant system 51 Why new features?
112
511 Excess of features
113
512 Vowel features and consonant features
115
Anterior Coronal and Strident
116
53 Round High Low and Back revisited
119
Voice and Tense
121
55 Nasal and Lateral
124
56 A final note on redundancy
126
Suggested reading to chapter 5
129
61 Phonetic and phonological units
130
62 What is a syllable?
131
63 Some unanswered questions
134
64 The structure of monosyllabic words
137
641 The onset
138
642 The coda
139
643 The peak
140
644 The rhyme
143
71 On the nature of stress
179
72 Stress and syllable structure
182
721 Final stress
183
722 Nonfinal stress
186
73 Stress and nonphonological structure
189
Metrical Phonology 741 The notation
193
742 Some generalisations
198
75 The nonpredictability of English word stress
205
Suggested reading to chapter 7
207
the realisations of phonemes 81 The phonetic level of representation
208
the principles
210
clear and dark 1
211
optionality versus nonbinarity and natural classes
213
unreleased stops
217
83 Allophony in the obstruent system
218
aspiration and glottalisation
219
devoicing
222
phonetic correlates of the voicing opposition
223
834 Glottal stops taps and some problems
225
841 Recapitulation
227
842 The Scottish VowelLength Rule
229
843 Vowellength allophony
234
85 Rules phonetic representations and binary features
235
851 The nonbinarity of phonetic representations
236
852 Rules features and natural classes
238
the archiphoneme
241
Suggested reading to chapter 8
248
9 Phrases sentences and the phonology of connected speech
249
91 Stress beyond the single word
250
911 Phrasal stress
252
912 Compound stress
254
921 Stresstiming in English
258
922 Metrical structure and the foot
260
the rhythmic adjustment of stress patterns
272
93 Syllables in connected speech
279
931 Liaison
280
932 Some effects of liaison
281
94 Structure simplification in connected speech
284
941 Vowel reduction and weak forms
285
942 Reduction elision assimilation
287
Suggested reading to chapter 9
290
101 On phonological theories
291
Generative Phonology 1021 The velar nasal phoneme or sequence?
297
a partial analysis
301
1023 The VowelShift derivation
305
free rides and derived environments
310
1031 What is a segment?
313
1032 Features and the Xtier
315
1033 Do feature matrices have structure?
321
Suggested reading to chapter 10
323
References
325
1ndex
330
Copyright

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