English synonymes, with copious illustrations and explanations, drawn from the best writers

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Harper, 1854 - English language - 535 pages
 

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Page 119 - All this ? ay, more : Fret, till your proud heart break; Go, show your slaves how choleric you are, And make your bondmen tremble.
Page 127 - Ye noble few ! who here unbending stand Beneath life's pressure, yet bear up awhile, And what your bounded view, which only saw A little part, deem'd Evil, is no more: The storms of Wintry Time will quickly pass, And one unbounded Spring encircle all.
Page 236 - He has often told me, that at his coming to his estate he found his parishioners very irregular : and that in order to make them kneel, and join in the responses, he gave every one of them a...
Page 181 - Nestling repair, and to the thicket some; Some to the rude protection of the thorn Commit their feeble offspring; the cleft tree Offers its kind concealment (to a few, Their food its insects, and its moss their nests. Others apart far in the grassy dale, Or roughening waste, their humble texture weave.
Page 192 - Omnipotent. Ay me ! they little know How dearly I abide that boast so vain, Under what torments inwardly I groan ; While they adore me on the throne of hell, With diadem and sceptre high advanced, The lower still I fall, only supreme In misery ; such joy ambition finds. But say I could repent, and could obtain By act of grace my former state ; how soon Would height recall high thoughts, how soon unsay What feign'd submission swore : ease would recant Vows made in pain, as violent and void.
Page 116 - Labour, and penury, the racks of pain, Disease, and sorrow's weeping train, And death, sad refuge from the storms of fate!
Page 211 - Brutes find out where their talents lie: A bear will not attempt to fly; A founder'd horse will oft debate, Before he tries a five-barr'd gate; A dog by instinct turns aside, Who sees the ditch too deep and wide. But man we find the only creature Who, led by Folly, combats Nature; Who, when she loudly cries, Forbear, With obstinacy fixes there; And, where his genius least inclines, Absurdly bends his whole designs.
Page 155 - If we consider the world in its subserviency to man, one would think it was made for our use ; but if we consider it in its natural beauty and harmony, one would be apt to conclude it was made for our pleasure.
Page 351 - What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed ? a beast, no more. Sure, he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unused.
Page 165 - O ! who can hold a fire in his hand By thinking on the frosty Caucasus? Or cloy the hungry edge of appetite By bare imagination of a feast? Or wallow naked in December snow By thinking on fantastic summer's heat? O no, the apprehension of the good Gives but the greater feeling to the worse : Fell sorrow's tooth doth never rankle more Than when it bites, but lanceth not the sore.

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