Entering Torah: Prefaces to the Weekly Torah Portion

Front Cover
Gefen Publishing House Ltd, 2009 - Religion - 310 pages
8 Reviews

For the believing Jew today, no less than for those in the past, the study of the weekly Torah portion is a religious experience. For this reason it is customary to consider the section along with its traditional commentaries. It is important to know not only what the Torah meant when it was written, but also what it has meant within Judaism since then. It is also important for intellectual honesty to distinguish between the two. Moderns also have the advantage of using the results of linguistic studies and comparative studies of other ancient texts as well as archaeological finds to help us better understand the text. The Torah reflects an entire worldview concerning the nature of God and of human beings, the task of Israel and the way in which we are to live. Thus it is an ancient text that is ever new and always renewing itself. One studies it not only to learn what was, but also to discover what we are and how we are to live. These prefaces are meant to complement and enrich your study of the portion by pointing out important ideas found therein and raising problems and questions for consideration. Enter into the Torah text with this insightful companion and experience the full impact of the age-old and totally new weekly portion

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bostonian71 - LibraryThing

Lucid and thought-provoking introductions to the weekly Torah readings. The pieces may be too short and elementary for people who've studied Torah for years, but were perfect for my beginning level. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jeffd1830 - LibraryThing

This book takes each Torah portion and overviews the subject matter. The points it choses to explore in each portion and the point of view it takes both seem to be fairly traditionalist/orthodox in my ... Read full review

Contents

III
5
IV
11
V
17
VI
23
VII
29
VIII
35
IX
41
X
47
XXXII
165
XXXIII
169
XXXIV
173
XXXV
179
XXXVI
185
XXXVII
189
XXXVIII
193
XXXIX
195

XI
53
XII
57
XIII
63
XIV
69
XV
75
XVI
77
XVII
83
XVIII
89
XIX
95
XX
101
XXI
107
XXII
113
XXIII
119
XXIV
125
XXV
131
XXVI
135
XXVII
141
XXVIII
143
XXIX
147
XXX
153
XXXI
159
XL
201
XLI
207
XLII
213
XLIII
219
XLIV
225
XLV
231
XLVI
237
XLVII
243
XLVIII
249
XLIX
251
L
257
LI
263
LII
269
LIII
275
LIV
281
LV
287
LVI
293
LVII
299
LVIII
305
LIX
309
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About the author (2009)

Rabbi Reuven Hammer received his rabbinic ordination and doctorate in theology from the Jewish Theological Seminary and a PhD from the School of Speech of Northwestern University. He headed the Israel programs of the Jewish Theological Seminary in Jerusalem and was also the founding director of the Seminary of Judaic Studies, today the Schechter Institute. The Jerusalem Post runs Rabbi Hammer s column Tradition Today. Two of his books, Sifre: A Tannaitic Commentary on the Book of Deuteronomy and Entering the High Holy Days, were awarded the National Jewish Book Council prize. He has also written The Jerusalem Anthology, Entering Jewish Prayer and The Classic Midrash, as well as a commentary on Siddur Sim Shalom entitled Or Hadash. Rabbi Hammer is currently the Head of the Rabbinical Court of the Rabbinical Assembly of Israel and a member of the Committee on Jewish Law and Standards of the international Rabbinical Assembly. He and his wife, Rahel, a Judaica artist, live in Jerusalem.

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