Enterprise Governance and Enterprise Engineering

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Feb 19, 2009 - Business & Economics - 428 pages
1 Review

Achieving enterprise success necessitates addressing enterprises in ways that match the complexity and dynamics of the modern enterprise environment. However, since the majority of enterprise strategic initiatives appear to fail – among which those regarding information technology – the currently often practiced approaches to strategy development and implementation seem more an obstacle than an enabler for strategic enterprise success.

Two themes underpin the fundamentally different views outlined in this book. First, the competence-based perspective on governance, whereby employees are viewed as the crucial core for effectively addressing the complex, dynamic and uncertain enterprise reality, as well as for successfully defining and operationalizing strategic choices. Second, enterprise engineering as the formal conceptual framework and methodology for arranging a unified and integrated enterprise design, which is a necessary condition for enterprise success.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Its a radical and outstanding book that I can recommend anyone who is interested in enterprise architecture to read.

Contents

Introduction
3
Enterprise Governance and Enterprise Engineering as Crucial Concepts
4
113 Enterprise Engineering
7
12 Growing Attention to Governance
9
122 The Difference Between Governance and Management Governance as an Organizational Competence
12
13 Relationships Between Governance Perspectives
13
131 Corporate Governance and IT Governance Relationship
14
132 Corporate Governance and Enterprise Governance Relationship
15
63 IT Governance Perspectives
198
632 IT Enablement
202
633 Information Economics
204
64 The Mechanistic IT Governance Approach
206
642 The Focus on Form Rather than Content
210
643 IT Performance in Terms of Enterprise Value?
212
65 The Necessary Focus on Design
213
652 Alignment Enablement and the Value of IT Resulting from Design
215

133 IT Governance and Enterprise Governance Relationship
16
14 Design and CompetenceOriented Governance
17
142 Enterprise Governance Competence
19
15 Outline of Further Chapters
21
2 Mechanistic and Organismic Perspectives on Governance
25
212 The Mechanistic Worldview
27
213 Mechanistic Thinking Manifest in Enterprises
29
214 Elements of Eastern Thought
35
22 Limits to Mechanistic Thinking
39
221 Uncertainty and Interconnectedness
40
222 Complexity Dynamics and Uncertainty
42
23 The Myth of Traditional Control
46
232 Managing People Rather than Process Capabilities
48
233 Management Accounting
49
234 Strategy Evolvement
52
235 Emergence
55
24 The Organismic Perspective
57
Employee Involvement
58
242 Productivity
59
243 Quality
61
244 Service
62
245 Enterprise Learning and Innovation
63
Addressing Complexity Dynamics and Uncertainty
66
247 Human Resources Engagement
68
25 The Fundamental Choice
71
252 From Mechanistic to Organismic Ways of Organizing
73
253 Our Own Position
75
Enterprise Essentials
79
The Birth of Enterprises
81
313 Functionalization and Coordination Differentiation and Integration
83
314 Are General Theories Possible about Enterprises?
85
32 Enterprise Development
87
322 Strategy Development
94
Position and Perspective
97
324 Conditions for Implementing Strategic Choices Successfully
98
325 Central Governance and Local Freedom
101
326 Enterprise Alignment and Enterprise Enablement
104
33 Employee Behavior and the Behavioral Context
105
332 Behavioral Context
107
34 Paradigm Shifts
114
System Thinking
116
412 What is a System?
118
413 Structuralfunctionalistic and Interpretative System Views
119
414 System Dynamics
122
415 Closed Open and Adaptive Systems
124
Coherence and Consistency
125
422 Architecture as a Normative Concept
127
423 The Phases of System Realization
129
424 Architecturing
130
425 Areas of Concern and Design Domains
132
426 Generic System Design Concepts and Process
136
427 The Architecturing Process
138
428 Publication of Architecture Principles
139
429 Architecture Framework
141
43 System Thinking and Emerging Enterprise Developments
143
432 In Defense of the System View
147
Governance Themes
150
Corporate Governance
151
52 The Emergence of the Corporate Governance Theme
155
The First Crisis in Corporate Governance
156
The Second Crisis in Corporate Governance
158
53 Corporate Governance Basic Elements
160
532 Forms of Ownership
162
54 Corporate Governance Reform
163
542 Core Elements of the Proposed Reform
164
543 The SarbanesOxley Legislation
167
55 Comments on the Proposed Reform
168
552 The Economic Value Criterion is Unsuitable for Governance
169
Bureaucracy and Juridicalization
171
High Costs and Questionable Value
172
Back to the Machine Bureaucracy
174
Will they Work?
175
558 The Limitations of the FinancialEconomic Corporate Governance Focus and the Necessity for Enterprise Governance
177
56 Frameworks for Corporate Governance
178
562 The COSO Framework
179
563 Is the COSO Approach Adequate?
180
564 Other Governance Frameworks
182
How to Arrange it?
184
Internal Control
185
573 Design Principles for Compliance
187
IT Governance
189
612 Why IT Governance?
191
62 IT Dynamics and Governance Paradox
192
621 IT Dynamics
193
622 Coordination Cooperation and Collaboration
194
623 IT Governance Paradox
195
653 Contextual Conditions for Effective Governance
219
66 IT Governance Competencies
220
661 Core Competencies of IT Governance
221
662 IT Strategy and Architecture Competence
222
663 IT Architecture Management
228
664 IT Project Portfolio Management Competence
229
665 IT Program Management Competence
232
667 The Collaborative Iterative and Concurrent Character of Activities
234
668 IT Governance Processes and Formal Meetings
237
669 Support Competencies
241
Central Governance
242
672 The Necessary Shift to Central Governance
244
673 Implementing the Three Core Competencies
245
674 The Economic Importance of IT Architecture and Central Governance
246
68 Reducing IT Legacy Complexity
247
682 IT Governance and Legacy Complexity
248
The Legacy Trap
249
685 The Transition to IT Commodity Infrastructure and Services
251
Guiding Principles
252
69 IT Governance Framework and Maturity Levels
253
691 The CobiT Framework
254
692 CMM Maturity Levels
256
694 Our Own Perspective on IT Governance Maturity
258
Enterprise Governance
261
712 Enterprise Challenges
262
Competence and Design Focus
263
Answering the Need for a New Approach
265
72 Enterprise Ontology
266
721 Theory
267
722 Methodology
276
723 Business Rules
288
724 Enterprise Design Process and the Role of Architecture
292
725 Benefits of the Enterprise Engineering Approach
295
73 Enterprise Architecture and Design Domains
296
732 Architecturing
297
733 Main Enterprise Design Domains
299
734 Business Design Domains and Business Architecture
302
735 Organization Design Domains and Organization Architecture
305
736 Information Design Domains and Information Architecture
309
737 Technology Design Domains and Technology Architecture
311
74 Enterprise Governance Competencies
314
742 Core Competencies of Enterprise Governance
315
743 Enterprise Strategy and Architecture Development HighLevel Design
317
744 Enterprise Architecture Management
320
745 Enterprise Project Portfolio Management and Program Management
321
The Role of the Governance Competence Illustrated
323
747 Enterprise Governance Process and Formal Meetings
325
748 Enterprise Governance Maturity Levels
329
75 ServiceOriented Architecture and Enterprise Governance
331
752 ServiceOriented Architecture and Enterprise Process Execution
333
753 ServiceOriented Architecture and Enterprise Governance
335
76 Competencies at the Personal Level
337
762 Competencies of the Enterprise Architect
339
The Praxis Illustrated
343
812 EnerServes Transformation
344
813 The Switching Process
345
814 New Perspectives
346
815 Strategic Choices
349
816 Areas of Concern
350
82 EnerServes New Requirements
353
822 Requirements Management
355
823 IT Development and Operational Management Requirements
356
83 EnerServes Ontology
358
832 State Model
362
833 Additional Transactions
363
834 Interstriction Model
364
835 Action Model and Business Rules
365
836 Process Models and the Definition of Services
366
837 Actor Roles and Functional Entities
367
84 Enterprise Architecture for EnerServe
368
842 Requirements and Architecture
369
843 Architecture Definition and Publication
370
844 Business Architecture
372
845 Organization Architecture
374
846 Information Architecture
378
847 IT Architecture
380
848 Architecture Principles and Areas of Concern
385
849 EnerServes legacy IT Systems Complexity and Service Oriented Architecture
388
85 EnerServe Commodity Infrastructure and Services
389
86 Highlevel Construction Models
392
87 Reflection
394
References
397
Index
415
About the Author
428
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Jan A.P. Hoogervorst studied Electrical Engineering at the Delft University of Technology, and completed his dissertation in Work and Organizational Psychology at the Amsterdam Free University. He fulfilled a number of managerial functions at KLM Royal Dutch Airlines and was responsible for Aircraft Systems Engineering, Aircraft and Aircraft Components Maintenance, Flight Crew Training, and Corporate Information Technology Strategy Development and Implementation. He currently works at Sogeti Netherlands as an organizational advisor and management consultant, and as part-time university lecturer in Enterprise Governance and Enterprise Engineering.