Enterprise Ontology: Theory and Methodology

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Springer Science & Business Media, May 16, 2006 - Computers - 244 pages
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If one thing catches the eye in almost all literature about (re)designing or (re)engineering of enterprises, it is the lack of a well-founded theory about their construction and operation. Often even the most basic notions like "action" or "process" are not precisely defined. Next, in order to master the diversity and the complexity of contemporary enterprises, theories are needed that separate the stable essence of an enterprise from the variable way in which it is realized and implemented.

Such a theory and a matching methodology, which has passed the test of practical experience, constitute the contents of this book. The enterprise ontology, as developed by Dietz, is the starting point for profoundly understanding the organization of an enterprise and subsequently for analyzing, (re)designing, and (re)engineering it. The approach covers numerous issues in an integrated way: business processes, in- and outsourcing, information systems, management control, staffing etc.

Researchers and students in enterprise engineering or related fields will discover in this book a revolutionary new way of thinking about business and organization. In addition, it provides managers, business analysts, and enterprise information system designers for the first time with a solid and integrated insight into their daily work.

 

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Contents

Outline of the Book
3
What is Enterprise Ontology?
7
An Explanatory Case
14
31 The Analysis of the Case Volley
16
32 The Ontological Model of the Case Volley
24
Foundations
33
Factual Knowledge
35
42 The Ontology of a World
41
The CRISP Model
126
142 Formal Definition of the CRISP Model
130
143 The Crispienet
133
The Methodology
136
The Modeling Method
137
152 The PerfomaInformaForma Analysis
144
153 The CoordinationActorsProduction Analysis
149
154 The Transaction Pattern Synthesis
154

A World Ontology Specification Language
44
51 The Declaration of Statum Types
46
52 The Specification of Existence Laws
49
53 The Derivation of Statum Types
51
54 Factum Types and Occurrence Laws
55
The Notion of System
57
62 Formal Definition of Ontological System
60
The Notion of Model
63
72 The WhiteBox Model
65
73 The BlackBox Model
67
Ontology and Enterprise Engineering
71
82 The System Development Process
75
The theory
78
The Operation Axiom
79
91 Coordination Acts
83
92 Production Acts
85
93 Actors
87
The Transaction Axiom
89
101 The Basic Transaction Pattern
90
102 The Standard Transaction Pattern
93
103 The Cancellation Patterns
95
The Composition Axiom
99
The Distinction Axiom
105
121 Communication
106
122 Coordination
109
123 Production
113
The Organization Theorem
115
131 The Realization of an Organization
117
132 The Implementation of an Organization
120
155 The Result Structure Analysis
157
156 The Construction Synthesis
158
The Interaction Model
159
161 The IAM of the Library
160
162 The IAM of the Pizzeria
166
163 Practical Relevance of the Interaction Model
170
The Process Model
173
171 The PM of the Library
174
172 The PM of the Pizzeria
180
173 Practical Relevance of the Process Model
183
The Action Model
185
181 The AM of the Library
186
182 The AM of the Pizzeria
191
183 Practical Relevance of the Action Model
195
The State Model
197
191 The SM of the Library
200
192 The SM of the Pizzeria
203
193 Practical Relevance of the State Model
204
The Interstriction Model
205
201 The ISM of the Library
206
202 The ISM of the Pizzeria
209
203 Practical Relevance of the Interstriction Model
213
Epilogue
215
Example Cases
217
Bibliography
224
Glossary
229
Index
240
Copyright

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Page 228 - Spyns P., Meersman R. & Jarrar M., (2002), Data modelling versus Ontology engineering, In, Sheth A.
Page 228 - Liu, K.; Hafkamp, M., & Ades, Y, 2000, Understanding the roles of signs and norms in organizations - a semiotic approach to information systems design, Journal of Behaviour and Information Technology 19(1).

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About the author (2006)

Jan L.G. Dietz is professor in Information Systems Design at Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands) since 1994, after having been professor in MIS at the University of Maastricht for 6 years. He holds a MSc in Electrical Engineering and a PhD in Computer Science, and has practitioned business automation for 10 years. He has published over 200 scientific and professional articles as well as several books. His current research interests are in Enterprise Engineering, Enterprise Architectures and Enterprise & Information Systems Ontology.