Enterprise and Trade in Victorian Britain: Essays in Historical Economics, Volume 3

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2003 - Business & Economics - 211 pages
The essays in this book focus on the controversies concerning Britain's economic performance between the mid-nineteenth century and the First World War. The overriding theme is that Britain's own resources were consistently more productive, more resilient and more successful than is normally assumed. And if the economy's achievement was considerable, the influence on it of external factors (trade, international competition, policy) were much less significant than is normally supposed.
The book is structured as follows: Part One: The Method of Historical Economics Part Two: Enterprise in Late Victorian Britain Part Three: Britain in the World Economy, 1846-1913.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Achievements of the Cliometric School
3
Does the Past Have Useful Economics?
19
Judgments on the Late
55
International Differences in Productivity? Coal and Steel
73
Controversies
111
Judgments on Trade
139
Free Trade and British
155
How the Gold Standard Worked 18801913
184
Index
209
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information