Entrepreneurial Journalism: How to Build What's Next for News

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CQ Press, Oct 12, 2011 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 320 pages
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Launch yourself into the new news economy. The digital revolution that provides so many options for news consumers also means massive opportunity for journalists. The trick: see the disruption as an opening you can attack.

Entrepreneurial Journalism will inspire you with what's possible and show you the mechanics behind building a business. Working through eight clear and concise stages, you'll explore the secrets of successful news startups (including how they're making money) and learn how to be an upstart yourself, building an innovative and sustainable news business from scratch.

Each chapter starts with a real entrepreneur's experience, teasing out how savvy and opportunistic journalists found their way to success. Mark Briggs then helps you size up the market, harness technology, turn your idea into a product or service, explore revenue streams, estimate costs, and launch. "Build Your Business" action items at the end of each chapter get you thinking through each step of your business plan.

Discover how traditional news organizations are evolving and innovating, where the jobs are today and where the new jobs will be tomorrow. Learn from the pioneers, and become one.

 

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About the author (2011)

Mark Briggs is the author of Entrepreneurial Journalism: How to Build What's Next for News (2012) and maintains Journalism 2.0 (journalism20.com/blog/), a widely read blog. He is a frequent speaker and presenter at journalism and media conferences throughout the U.S. and Europe and was named to Presstime magazine's "20 under 40" list for 2007. He is currently director of digital media for King 5 Television in Seattle and a Ford Fellow in Entrepreneurial Journalism at The Poynter Institute. Previously, he co-founded Serra Media, a Seattle-based technology company, and spent nine years running newspaper websites in Everett and Tacoma, Wash. He earned journalism degrees from Gonzaga University and the University of North Carolina and also served as an adjunct professor at Seattle University from 2002-2006.

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