Epicurus's Morals

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

An excellent edition to a rather brilliant work of philosophy. The tone of the work seems to wander between humble chasteness, righteous elitism, and general instruction. There is a fair consistency to the rhetoric, though I must say there is also a good deal to be disagreed with (such as Epicurus's take on the Cynics), but is not one of the objectives of good philosophy to inspire such reflection and disagreement?
I found the work most accessible, and, personally, enjoy the early 18th century tongue this was printed in. There are countless references, and quotes, of Roman and Greek thinkers, princes, etc. in the 'reflections' of the morals which, alone, are quite inspiring to thought. Epic work of philosophy here,...
 

Selected pages

Contents

I
II
1
III
9
IV
10
V
13
VI
14
VII
17
VIII
20

IX
22
X
23
XI
24
XII
27
XIII
29
XIV
30
XV
32
XVI
34
XVII
37
XVIII
38
XIX
39
XX
41
XXI
42
XXII
43
XXIII
45
XXIV
47
XXV
49
XXVI
50
XXVII
51
XXVIII
52
XXIX
53
XXX
55
XXXI
57
XXXII
59
XXXIII
60
XXXIV
61
XXXV
65
XLIV
113
XLV
115
XLVI
116
XLVII
118
XLVIII
122
XLIX
123
L
125
LI
127
LII
128
LIII
130
LIV
132
LV
134
LVI
135
LVII
136
LVIII
138
LIX
139
LX
141
LXI
142
LXII
145
LXIII
146
LXIV
148
LXV
150
LXVI
152
LXVII
154
LXVIII
155
LXIX
157

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 175 - Vitellius his table, which did hold As many creatures, as the ark of old ; That fiscal table, to which every day All countries did a constant tribute pay, Could nothing more delicious afford, Than nature's liberality, Help'd with a little art and industry, Allows the meanest gard'ner's board. The wanton taste no fish or fowl can choose, For which the grape or melon she would lose; Though all th...
Page 172 - ... feet. He that can look death in the face, and bid it welcome; open his door to poverty, and bridle his appetites; this is the man whom Providence has established in the possession of inviolable delights. The pleasures of the vulgar are ungrounded, thin, and superficial; but the other are solid and eternal.
Page 172 - Epicurus in this ; that the true felicity of life is to be free from perturbations, to understand our duty towards God and man, and to enjoy the present without any anxious dependence upon the future...
Page 203 - It is a good thing, to have a conscience void of offence, both towards God, and towards man.
Page 222 - Imprint this maxim deeply in* your mind, that there is nothing certain in this human and mortal state ; by which means you will avoid being transported with prosperity, and being dejected in adversity.
Page 216 - You'l difcharge your felf bell of your Duty to your Friends, if you do not wait till they apply to you ^ but freely, and of your own accord Relieve and Affift 'em when occafion requires.
Page 167 - They have fully proved his pleafures to be as ievere as the ftoicks virtue ; that to be debauched like Epicurus, a man muft be as fober as Zeno. — His temperance was fo ". great that his ordinary diet was nothing. but bread and water.
Page 196 - Petronius should be one of the Company; but as it required time to deliberate, whether they ought to put a Man of his Figure to Death, without clear proof of the Crimes he stood...
Page 175 - And in a garden's (hade that fovereign pleafure fought ; Whoever a true epicure would be, May there find cheap and virtuous luxury.
Page 198 - Philosophy, Cato, and Roman Suicide: I', 72. his disciples seem more in love with death than they actually had been. 'There is no Necessity for us to live in Necessity', Charleton englished Epicurus, 'since Nature hath been so Kind as to give us, though but one door into the World, yet many doors out of it.'75 Lucretius...

Bibliographic information