Escape from the Market: Negotiating Work in Lancashire

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 12, 1996 - Business & Economics - 222 pages
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At the outset of the industrial revolution the Lancashire labour market was a model of thoroughgoing competition. Wages adjusted quickly and smoothly to changes in the demand for and supply of labour. Within two generations, however, workers and firms had retreated from the market. Instead of busting wages, firms paid fixed rates; instead of breaking ties on short notice, workers sought longer-term associations. Social norms - doing the right thing - protected and preserved the fresh labour market arrangements. This book explains the causes and effects of changes in the labour market in the context of developments in labour economics and fresh research in social and economic history.
 

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Contents

the early labor market
17
the labor market into
33
Whos minding the mill? The supervision problem
49
The fair wage model
63
18251850
81
Short hours and seniority in the hungryforties
110
wage lists in Lancashire
132
More lessons from the cotton mills
151
Notes
161
Bibliography
199
Index
219
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