Essay on the Principles of Translation

Front Cover
T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1797 - Translating and interpreting - 416 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 366 - The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of despised love, the law's delay, The insolence of office, and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin...
Page 75 - That servile path thou nobly dost decline Of tracing word by word, and line by line : A new and nobler way thou dost pursue, To make translations, and translators too : They but preserve the ashes, thou the flame, True to his sense, but truer to his fame.
Page 383 - For he was of that stubborn crew Of errant saints, whom all men grant To be the true church militant ; Such as do build their faith upon The holy text of pike and gun ; Decide all controversies by Infallible artillery ; And prove their doctrine orthodox By apostolic blows and knocks...
Page 396 - O, how oft shall he On faith and changed gods complain, and seas Rough with black winds, and storms Unwonted shall admire ! Who now enjoys thee credulous, all gold, Who always vacant, always amiable Hopes thee, of flattering gales Unmindful. Hapless they, To whom thou untried seem'st fair ! Me, in my vow'd Picture, the sacred wall declares to have hung My dank and dropping weeds To the stern God of sea.
Page 395 - In early youth I die : Was I to blame, because his bride Was thrice as rich as I ? "Ah, Colin ! give not her thy vows, Vows due to me alone : Nor thou, fond maid, receive his kiss, Nor think him all thy own.
Page 87 - Olympus' cloudy tops arise, The sire of gods his awful silence broke; The heavens attentive trembled as he spoke: "Celestial states! immortal gods! give ear, Hear our decree, and reverence what ye hear; The fix'd decree which not all heaven can move; Thou, fate! fulfil it! and, ye powers, approve!
Page 327 - Sire, dit le Renard, vous êtes trop bon Roi ; Vos scrupules font voir trop de délicatesse ; Eh bien, manger moutons, canaille, sotte espèce, Est-ce un péché ? Non non. Vous leur fîtes Seigneur, En les croquant beaucoup d'honneur. Et quant au Berger, l'on peut dire Qu'il était digne de tous maux, Étant de ces gens-là qui sur les animaux Se font un chimérique empire.
Page 88 - Whose strong embrace holds heaven, and earth, and main: Strive all, of mortal, and immortal birth, To drag, by this, the Thunderer down to earth. Ye strive in vain! If I but stretch this hand, I heave the gods, the ocean, and the land; I fix the chain to great Olympus
Page 141 - So shall the fairest face appear, When youth and years are flown: Such is the robe that kings must wear, When death has reft their crown.
Page 87 - Or far, oh ! far from steep Olympus thrown, Low in the dark Tartarean gulf shall groan, With burning chains fix'd to the brazen floors, And lock'd by hell's inexorable doors ; As deep beneath th' infernal centre hurl'd, As from that centre to th

Bibliographic information