Essays

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Cosimo, Inc., 1. märts 2007 - 156 pages
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In this collection of essays originally published in 1625, Bacon delves in to a variety of topics, using inductive reasoning to find truth based on observations of the world. The application of inductive reason to scientific and philosophical pursuits was a breakthrough in the history of human knowledge. Students of history and philosophy, as well as those intrigued by the world's great minds, can find in these essays Sir Francis Bacon's commentary on such topics as: .Death .Religion .Beauty .Friendship .Anger .The Nature of Men SIR FRANCIS BACON (1561-1626) was a British scientist and philosopher who is best remembered for inventing the scientific method of hypothesis and experimentation that is used today. Many of his writings discussed how to use this method for philosophical inquiry. As a man of religion, Bacon was careful to distinguish between reason-based philosophy and faith-based revelation, considering both essential to human thought.
 

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Contents

Essays oe CoukselsCivil and Moral
7
Of Death
9
Of Unity in Religion
11
Of Revenge
15
Of Adversity
16
Of Simulation and Dissimulation
17
Of Parents and Children
20
Of Marriage and Single Life
22
Of Regiment of Health
85
Of Suspicion
86
Of Discourse
87
Of Plantations
89
Of Riches
92
Of Prophecies
95
Of Ambition
99
Of Masques and Triumphs
100

Of Envy
23
Of Love
28
Of Great Place
29
Of Boldness
33
Of Goodness and Goodness of Nature
34
Of Nobility
36
Of Seditions and Troubles
38
Of Atheism
44
Of Superstition
47
Of Travel
48
XIX Of Empire
50
Of Counsel
55
Of Delays
59
Of Cunning
60
Of Wisdom for a Mans Self
63
Of Innovations
65
Of Dispatch
66
Of Seeming Wise
67
Of Friendship
69
Of Ejqpense 7S XXIX Of the True Greatness of Kingdoms and Estates
76
Of Nature fa Men lot XXXIX Of Custom and Education
103
Of Fortune
105
Of Usury
106
Of Beauty
111
Of Deformity im
112
Of Building
114
Of Gardens
117
Of Negotiating
123
XLVfll Of Followers and Friends ia XLIX Of Suitors
126
Of Studies
128
Of Faction
129
Of Ceremonies and Aspects
131
Of Praise
132
Of Vainglory
135
Of Judicature
137
Of Anger
141
Of Vicissitude of Things
143
Of Fam
147
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Page 8 - But howsoever these things are thus in men's depraved judgments and affections, yet truth, which only doth judge itself, teacheth that the inquiry of truth, which is the love-making or wooing of it, the knowledge of truth, which is the presence of it, and the belief of truths which is the enjoying of it, is the sovereign good of human nature.

About the author (2007)

Francis Bacon was born on January 22, 1561 in London. After studying at Cambridge, Bacon began a legal career, ultimately becoming a barrister in 1582. Bacon continued his political ascent, and became a Member of Parliament in 1584. In 1600, he served as Queen Elizabeth's Learned Counsel in the trial of Robert Devereaux, the Earl of Essex. After numerous appointments under James I, Bacon admitted to bribery and fell from power. Much of Bacon's fame stems from the belief by some that he was the actual author of the plays of William Shakespeare. While many critics dismissed that belief, Bacon did write several important works, including a digest of laws, a history of Great Britain, and biographies of the Tudor monarchy, including Henry VII. Bacon was also interested in science and the natural world. His scientific theories are recorded in Novum Organum, published in 1620. Bacon's interest in science ultimately led to his death. After stuffing a fowl with snow to study the effect of cold on the decay of meat, he fell ill, and died of bronchitis on April 9, 1626.

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