Essays on Phrenology: Or An Inquiry Into the Principles and Utility of the System of Drs. Gall and Spurzheim, and Into the Objections Made Against it

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H.C. Carey and I. Lea, 1822 - Brain - 463 pages
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Page 311 - ... our own nature. The mind can take a view of what passes within itself, its propensions, aversions, passions, affections, as respecting such objects, and in such degrees, and of the several actions consequent thereupon. In this survey it approves of one, disapproves of another, and towards a third is affected in neither of these ways, but is quite indifferent. This principle in man, by which he approves or disapproves his heart, temper, and ' actions, is conscience; for this is the strict sense...
Page 311 - There is a principle of reflection in men, by which they distinguish between, approve, and disapprove their own actions. We are plainly constituted such sort of creatures as to reflect upon our own nature. The mind can take a view of what passes within itself, its propensions, aversions, passions, affections, as respecting such objects, and in such degrees, and of the several actions consequent thereupon. In this survey it approves of one, disapproves of another, and towards a third is affected in...
Page 195 - I can discover, are the windows by which light is let into this dark room; for methinks the understanding is not much unlike a closet wholly shut from light, with only some little opening left, to let in external visible resemblances, or ideas of things without: would the pictures coming into such a dark room but stay there, and lie so orderly as to be found upon occasion, it would very much resemble the understanding of a man, in reference to all objects of sight, and the ideas of them.
Page 239 - It gives a manner of feeling and of thinking, befitting the " regions of fancy, rather than the abodes of men.
Page 123 - Whilst, on the other hand, many and most important changes are frequently discovered in both the brain and its membranes, in cases which betrayed either no cerebral disorder, or none calculated to excite suspicion during life of any organic change." * The truth is, says Dr. Roget, that there is not a single part of the encephalon which has not, in one case or other, been impaired, destroyed, or found defective, without any apparent change in the sensitive, intellectual, or moral faculties ; a statement...
Page 408 - I could not but view his works with astonishment ; he forged his iron and steel, and melted his metal ; he had tools of every sort, for working in wood, ivory, and metals. He had made a lathe, by which he had cut a perpetual screw in brass, a thing little known at that day, and which I believe was the invention of Mr.
Page 407 - Another time, he attended some men who were fixing a pump at a neighbouring village, and observing them cut off a piece of bored pipe, he procured it, and actually made with it a working pump that raised water.
Page 106 - Although we cannot doubt that the operations oj our intellect always depend upon certain motions taking place in the brain; yet these motions have never been the objects of our senses, nor have we been able to perceive that any particular part of the brain has more concern in the operations of our intellect than any other. Neither have we attained any knowledge of what share the several...
Page 311 - We are plainly constituted such sort of creatures as to reflect upon our own nature. The mind can take a view of what passes within itself, its propensions, aversions, passions, affections, as respecting such objects, and in such degrees, and of the several actions consequent thereupon. In this survey it approves of one, disapproves of another, and towards a third is affected in neither of these ways, but is quite indifferent. This principle in man, by which he approves or disapproves his heart,...
Page xxxv - A cat frequented a closet, the door of which was fastened by a common iron latch ; a window was situated near the door: when the door was shut, the cat gave herself no uneasiness, for...

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