Essential Elements in Early Intervention: Visual Impairment and Multiple Disabilities

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Deborah Chen
American Foundation for the Blind, 1999 - Family & Relationships - 503 pages
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The latest comprehensive resource from an outstanding early childhood specialist, this guide provides a range of information on effective early intervention with young children who are visually impaired and have other disabilities. Containing valuable explanations of functional and clinical vision and hearing assessments, descriptions of evaluative and educational techniques, and useful suggestions on working with families and with professional teams, Essential Elements in Early Intervention provides practitioners with expert insights for successful interventive efforts.
 

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Contents

Meeting the Intervention Needs of Infants
55
Clinical Vision Assessments for Infants
107
Chapter 5
139
Functional Vision Assessments and Early Interventions
157
Evaluating Infants
246
Developing Meaningful Interventions
287
Beginning Communication with Infants
337
Educating Young
378
Selected Resources
421
Glossary
441
Index
485
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About the author (1999)

Deborah Chen, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Special Education, California State University, Northridge (CSUN), teaches in the Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) programs. She also supervises ECSE credential candidates in early intervention and early childhood special education programs located in highly diverse communities in Los Angeles and surrounding counties. As an immigrant to the United States from Jamaica (West Indies) with Chinese roots, Dr. Chen has a personal and professional interest in working with families of diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

Dr. Chen has extensive experience serving with families and their children with sensory impairments and multiple disabilities as an early interventionist, teacher, program administrator, teacher trainer, and researcher. She has directed projects of significance, model demonstration, outreach, research-to-practice, and personnel development projects funded by the U.S. Department of Education. These projects have focused on working with families and children of diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, home-based early intervention, interdisciplinary training, caregiver-child interactions, and early communication and tactile communication strategies with children who are deaf-blind. Her publications reflect these professional efforts and interests.

Dr. Chen has disseminated her work at local, state, national, and international conferences. In addition, she has been invited to conduct professional development courses and to present at international conferences in Australia, Canada, Italy, the Netherlands, Qatar, Taiwan, and Thailand.

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