Eternal Vigilance?: 50 Years of the CIA

Front Cover
Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, Christopher M. Andrew
Taylor & Francis, 1997 - Political Science - 246 pages
0 Reviews
Eternal Vigilance? seeks to offer reinterpretations of some of the major established themes in CIA history such as its origins, foundations, its treatment of the Soviet threat, the Iranian revolution and the accountability of the agency. The book also opens new areas of research such as foreign liaison, relations with the scientific community, use of scientific and technical research and economic intelligence. The articles are both by well-known scholars in the field and young researchers at the beginning of their academic careers. Contributors come almost equally from both sides of the Atlantic. All draw, to varying degrees, on recently declassified documents and newly-available archives and, as the final chapter seeks to show, all point the way to future research.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The American Road to Central Intelligence Bradley F Smith
1
Why Was the CIA Established in 1947? Rhodri JeffreysJones
21
Intelligence and the Cold War Behind
41
The CIAs
82
The Committee of CorrespondenceCIA
104
National Intelligence and the Iranian
143
The CIA and the Question of Accountability Loch K Johnson
178
The CIAs Own Effort to Understand
201
An Agenda for Future
224
Index
237
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (1997)

Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones is professor emeritus of American history, Edinburgh University. His previous books include "The CIA and American Democracy," "Peace Now! American Society and the Ending of the Vietnam War," and "Cloak and Dollar: A History of American Secret Intelligence," all published by Yale University Press.

Christopher Andrew is Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at Cambridge University, a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, former Visiting Professor of National Security at Harvard University, and guest lecturer at numerous American universities and the CIA. His writings, translated into many languages, have established him as one of the world's leading authorities in intelligence history. Professor Andrew is also a frequent host of BBC TV and radio programs on history and world affairs.