Ethical Vegetarianism: From Pythagoras to Peter Singer

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SUNY Press, 1999 - Philosophy - 287 pages
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For vegetarians seeking the historical roots of vegetarianism, for animal rights activists and the environmentally concerned, and for those questioning their consumption of meat, here's a book that provides a deep understanding of vegetarianism as more than just a dietary decision.

This is the first comprehensive collection of primary source material on vegetarianism as a moral choice and includes the writings of Carol Adams, Bernard de Mandeville, Mohandas Gandhi, Oliver Goldsmith, Anna Kingsford, Frances Moore Lappé, Porphyry, Pythagoras, Tom Regan, Albert Schweitzer, Seneca, Peter Singer, Leo Tolstoy, and Richard Wagner, among others.
 

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Contents

Antiquity The Kinship of Humans and Animals
11
The Kinship of All Life
13
Abstinence and the Philosophical Life
23
On the Eating of Flesh
27
On Abstinence from Animal Food
35
The Eighteenth Century Diet and Human Character
47
The Carnivorous Custom and Human Vanity
49
Carnivorous Callousness
57
Diet and Morality
139
The Ethic of Reverence for Life
145
The Moral Basis of Vegetarianism
153
All Animals Are Equal
165
The Right Not to Be Eaten
177
An Ecological Argument for Vegetarianism
189
The Pretext of Necessary Suffering
203
Like Driving a Cadillac
209

They Pity and Eat the Objects of Their Compassion
61
The Dubious Right to Eat Flesh
65
A Vindication of Natural Diet
69
The Nineteenth Century Diet and Compassion
75
A Shameful Human Infirmity
77
The World is a Mighty Slaughterhouse and FleshEating and Human Decimation
81
Human Beasts of Prey and FellowSuffering
89
The Immorality of Carnivorism
97
The Essence of True Justice
107
The Twentieth Century Diet Rights and the Global Perspective
113
The Humanities of Diet
115
Universal Kinship
127
The Unpardonable Crime
135
Food Animal Production and the Vegetarian Option
221
Its Influence on Future Farming Patterns
233
Contextual Moral Vegetarianism
241
The Social Construction of Edible Bodies and Humans as Predators
247
Arguments against Ethical Vegetarianism
253
Animals and Slavery
259
Automatism of Brutes
261
We Have Only Indirect Duties to Animals
267
Bibliography of Antivegetarian Sources
271
For Further Reading
273
Sources and Acknowledgments
277
Index
283
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Page 1 - If there are any marks at all of special design in creation, one of the things most evidently designed is that a large proportion of all animals should pass their existence in tormenting and devouring other animals. They have been lavishly fitted out with the instruments necessary for that purpose; their strongest instincts impel them to it, and many of them seem to have been constructed incapable of supporting themselves by any other food.

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About the author (1999)

Kerry S. Walters is Professor of Philosophy and Lisa Portmess is Chair of the Philosophy Department at Gettysburg College. Professor Walters is the editor of Re-thinking Reason: New Perspectives in Critical Thinking, also published by SUNY Press.

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