Ethical Issues in Social Work

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Psychology Press, 1995 - Business & Economics - 200 pages
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It has always been recognised that the practice of social work raises ethical questions. This collection of essays explores these questions in the light of recent developments in philosophy and in social work theory and practice.It has always been recognised that the practice of social work raises ethical questions and dilemmas. Recently, however, traditional ways of addressing ethical issues in social work have come to seem inadequate, as a result of developments both in philosophy and in social work theory and practice. This collection of thought-provoking essays explores the ethics of social work practice on the light of these changes.Ethical Issues in Social Work provides up to date critical analyses of the ethical implications of new legislation in community care and criminal justice, and of trends in social work thought and policy, such as managerialism, user empowerment, feminism and anti-oppressive practice.This study provides important and stimulating reading for social work students and their teachers, and for all practitioners and managers who are concerned about the ethical dimensions of their work.

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About the author (1995)

Richard Hugman is Professor and Head of the School of Social Work at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

David Smith has been teaching introductory computer science classes for engineers at the Georgia Institute of Technology since 1997 when he retired from industry. Previously, he worked 31 years for Lockheed-Martin at their Marietta, Georgia, facility as a systems and software specialist with a focus on intelligent systems. He was active in designing and developing software for the C-130J, C-27J, F-22 and C-5 aircraft, and was the technical leader of the Pilot's Associate program, a $42 million research project sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.
He has a bachelor's degree in aeronautical engineering from Southampton University, and a master's degree in control systems from Imperial College, London.