Moral Freedom

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Transaction Publishers - Religion - 288 pages
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Ethics is Nicolai Hartmann's magnum opus on moral philosophy. Volume 1, Moral Phenomena, is concerned with the nature and structure of ethical phenomena. Volume 2, Moral Values, describes all values as forming a complex and imperfectly known system. The final volume, Moral Freedom, deals with one of the oldest puzzles in both philosophy and theology: the individual's freedom of the will.

Freedom of the will is a necessary precondition of morality. Without it, there is no morality in the full sense of the word. In Moral Freedom Hartmann sets out to refute the determinist view that freedom of the will is impossible. Following Kant, while rejecting his transcendentalism, Hartmann first discusses the tension between causality and the freedom of the will.

The tension between the determination by moral values and the freedom of the will is next examined, a crucial issue completely overlooked by Kant and virtually all other modern philosophers, but recognized by the scholastics. Why should we believe in the freedom of the will with regard to the moral values? Are there good reasons for thinking that it exists? If freedom of the will vis--vis the moral values does exist, how is it to be conceived? Moral Freedom concludes with the famous postscript on the antinomies between ethics and religion.

Hartmann's Ethics may well be the most outstanding treatise on moral philosophy in the twentieth century. Andreas Kinneging's introduction sheds light on the volume's continuing relevance.

Nicolai Hartmann was born in 1882 in Riga, Latvia. He studied philosophy and classics, first in St. Petersburg and later in Marburg, where he was appointed to a chair of philosophy in 1920. In 1931, Hartmann was offered the prestigious chair of philosophy by the University of Berlin, where he lectured until the end of the war, untainted by Nazism. From 1945 until his death in 1950 he held a chair of philosophy at the University of Gttingen.

Andreas A.M. Kinneging is associate professor in legal philosophy at the University of Leiden, and author of several works in normative theory and intellectual history, including Aristocracy, Antiquity, and History: Classicism in Political Thought, published by Transaction.

 

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Contents

TRANSACTION INTRODUCTION
xi
CHAPTER PM
19
HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT or me PROBLEM
29
ERRONEOUS CONCEPTIONS or FREEDOM
37
cumen PAGE
53
DmnMiNisM AND INDETERMINISM
62
Dermuvimism CAUSAL AND FINALISTIC
73
ONTOLOGICAL Reoumnnv as THE BASIS or FREEDOM
86
Pnoors or METAPHYSICAL Onpzcrs
137
Rssrowsmrurv AND Accomaarun 154
154
Conscrousms or Gumr
172
SUPPLEMENTARY GROUPS OF Facrs
179
CHAPTER PAGE
205
SOLUTION OP nnz OUGHTANTINOMY
213
Paoamms STILL UNSOLVBD
231
CHAPTER
251

CHAPTER PAGE
101
True szur STATE or THE PROBLEM
126

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Page xvii - Moral values presuppose other goods and the specific quality and worth belonging to them. In fact, wherein would an honest man be superior to a thief, if the things purloined were not somehow of value ? What one man can steal, what another can treasure as a possession, is not merely a thing but a good. Honesty, then, if it is a moral value, necessarily presupposes the positive worth of material goods. It is inherently dependent upon the latter.

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