Ethics, Law, and Aging Review, Volume 11: Deinstitutionalizing Long Term Care: Making Legal Strides, Avoiding Policy Errors

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Marshall B. Kapp, JD, MPH, FCLM
Springer Publishing Company, Sep 1, 2005 - Law - 136 pages
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We are now engaged in a movement that de-emphasizes the reliance on institutional forms of long-term care for disabled persons needing ongoing daily living assistance and converges on the use of non-institutional service providers abnd residential settings.

In this latest edition of Ethics, Law and Aging Review , Kapp and ten expert contributors help us examine the forces and potential for changeing the long-term care industry (both positively and negatively) and address this paradigm shift from the inpersonal, public psychiatric institutions of the 1960s and 1970s to the present-day assisted living environments that have been fueled by economic, social, polictical, and legal forces.

Most important ly, this volume identifies obstaclesto change and enlighten service providers, advocates, and key policy makers to the pitfalls that can largely interfere with positive outcomes as a result of long-term care deinstitutionalization.

    Topics explored include:
  1. Community-based alternatives for older adults with serious mental illness
  2. Failing consumer-directed alternatives to nursing homes
  3. Ethics of Medicare privatization
 

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Contents

Part II Independent Article
103
Book Reviews
113
Books Received
119

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About the author (2005)

Marshall B. Kapp, JD, MPH, FCLM, was educated at Johns Hopkins University (BA), George Washington University (JD with Honors), and Harvard University (MPH). Since August 1980, he has been a faculty member in the School of Medicine at Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, where he is the Frederick A. White Distinguished Service Professor in the Departments of Community Health and Psychiatry and Director of the WSU Office of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology. He holds an adjunct faculty appointment at the University of Dayton School of Law. In addition to being admitted to practice law in a number of state and federal courts, he is also licensed as a Nursing Home Administrator in the District of Columbia. He is the author of a substantial number of published books, articles, and reviews.

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