Ethnology and phrenology, as an aid to the historian

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1863
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Page 126 - ... activity and refinement. Everywhere merchants, and always religious enthusiasts, they have also occasionally approved themselves as scholars and philosophers, physical and metaphysical, of no mean order. More robust, but less subtile in their mental constitution than the Hindoos — more prone to emotion and less qualified for speculation — active, enterprising, energetic, chivalrous, and devout, they furnish a providential link between the dreamily meditative theosophy of the farther East,...
Page 37 - ... faculties are stronger than his reflective or imaginative, and he dwells in the real rather than the ideal. He never rises from a fact to a principle, or re-creates beauty from the faultless beau-ideal of artistic conception. He has but little reverence for the past, and no very brilliant anticipation of the future, being from the overwhelming strength of his sensuous nature swallowed up in the present.
Page 125 - ... nearly all cases there is a strong development of the Bilious element, associated often, especially among the Jews, with a predominance of the Vital instead of the Motive constitution (the Bilious-Vital Temperament). The Mental element is always influential, especially in its intuitive manifestations. Moors at Cordova, the Semitic tribes, though wild and unsubduable by the softening influences of civilization in the remoter fastnesses of their native habitat, have, nevertheless, shown considerable...
Page 185 - ... to the unlimited vastitudes of the infinite and eternal, of which a Gothic cathedral is so befitting and so magnificent an expression ? The Parthenon is thought manifested in marble ; York Minster is faith reflected in stone. One is the product of intellect ; the other is the offspring of the moral sentiments. The first is an idea ; the last is a prayer. Artists designed the former, but saints must have conceived the latter.
Page 126 - ... manifestations. Moors at Cordova, the Semitic tribes, though wild and unsubduable by the softening influences of civilization in the remoter fastnesses of their native habitat, have, nevertheless, shown considerable aptitude both for literature and science, when subjected to culture at the great urban centers of intellectual activity and refinement. Everywhere merchants, and always religious enthusiasts, they have also occasionally approved themselves as scholars and philosophers, physical and...
Page 239 - ... eminently conduce to delicacy and precision in mechanical manipulation, and as they are usually combined with considerable Constructiveness and Ideality, much ingenuity will be manifested in the finer trades which are devoted to the production of ornaments and the decoration of either persons or buildings. With all this, however, there is, as we have already observed, good taste, rather than creative power, the volume of brain not being sufficient for the latter. Hence a people so constituted...
Page 111 - Borne, and which, in its increasing splendour, is producing the light and the power of modern civilization? Why, we repeat, is this so ? and the answer is, that India has a population in structure and temperament so allied to the nobler peoples of Europe — so essentially and generically one with them, that Comparative Philologists and Ethnologists have agreed to designate them by the one embracing term, IndoEuropean, to signify their relationship and their unity.
Page 111 - Aryan race, with its activity and susceptibility- — the ivory cranium, with its expanded frontal and elevated coronal region, in these and similar data, far more than in the accidents of war and the diplomacy of courts, are the real causes of India's ancient influence over neighbouring countries, and even over distant regions, to be sought, if we would grapple with fact, and see not the figments of a heated fancy, but the stern and enduring realities of nature.
Page 126 - East, and the almost rude practicality of the extreme West. By commerce they united India with Britain in ages which we now term prehistoric. By conquest they joined Spain with Persia in one vast empire under the early Caliphs. And by proselytism, as Nazarenes, they laid the foundation of that Christendom which now holds the fortunes of the world in its imperial...
Page 2 - Xor are these merely scientific appliances sufficient. It asks, in addition, for the aid of learning; not the formal pedantry of classical scholarship, or childish curiosity of olden antiquarianism, but the great lingual facts of an all-embracing Philology, and the still more important monumental data, which are being slowly furnished by modern explorers. It is too wide a subject...

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