Ethology and Human Development

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Rowman & Littlefield, 1992 - Psychology - 273 pages
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The developmental origins of human behavior are often seen as having parallels with the natural world of animal behavior. Researchers in ethology, the biological study of animal behavior, have amassed an enormous body of research, but the psychological study of child development has often ignored the findings, with the notable exception of John Bowlby's use of imprinting as a basis for a novel theory of human attachment. The author of this new book, a psychologist who has carried out research in ethology, evaluates the impact of several decades of ethological work on developmental psychology. He views human development from the context of the natural world, thereby re-establishing the links, begun with Charles Darwin, between research on child development and animal behavior. Chapters summarize important research on observational methods, animal models, social processes, sociobiology, the comparative method, non-verbal communication, and mental processes.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Observational methods
12
Animal models
39
General principles of development
56
Motivational concepts
81
Functional explanations
110
Dominance and other group processes
128
The comparative method
149
Nonverbal communication and the expression of emotions
176
Cognitive ethology the mental experiences of animals
201
References
227
Name index
264
Subject index
270
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About the author (1992)

John Archer is Professor of Psychology at the University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK. His research interests are aggression, violence, sex and gender, and grief. He is the author of a number of books, including The Nature of Grief (1999), Ethology and Human Development (1992) and The Behavioural Biology of Aggression (1988). He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and President-Elect of the International Society for Research on Aggression.

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