Eugenics: The Science of Human Improvement by Better Breeding

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Page 22 - unit defect" is not, as already pointed out, easily determined, nor is a given gross defect probably identical in the parental strains unless the parents are cousins. Despite these difficulties in its application the rule holds, by and large, as a valuable first approximation. Of unit defects the weakness of mucous membranes seems to be a good illustration. If both parents are subject to colds, catarrh, bronchitis, asthma or lung-tuberculosis all or nearly all of the children are liable to these...
Page 28 - Dr. H. H. Goddard, Director of the Department of Psychological Research at the New Jersey Training School for Feeble Minded Girls and Boys, as secretary. At the present moment this committee is collecting answers to the question : "Do two imbecile parents ever beget normal children?" This committee has most important interests, since the number of feeble-minded in the United States alone is probably not less than 150,000, of which 15,000 are in institutions." A sub-committee on Insanity is being...
Page 11 - We may now extend the study of the method of inheritance to cases of abnormalities and diseases, and we shall see that just as it is hard to draw the line between these two sorts of characteristics so they show no difference in their general method of inheritance. A typical example of an abnormality is that of brachydactyly or short-fingeredness, a condition in which each digit comprises only two phalanges — the fingers are all thumbs.
Page 19 - D family the center of susceptibility is more specific, being nearly confined to the nose and throat (B, 4). In the E family the center of weakness is the ear (B, 5). In the N family the trouble seems to spread from the throat (B, 6). In the M family the susceptibility is more nearly confined to the lungs (B, 7). In another family the skin seems to be the weak organ, boils and eczema are common (B, 1).
Page 8 - It is a corollary of the foregoing that if the individual with a simplex character be mated to one lacking the character half of the offspring will lack the determiner and half will be simplex, again, in respect to the character. If in both parents the character be simplex, then two like determiners will meet in one-fourth of the unions of egg and sperm, the two will both be absent in one-fourth of the unions, and one only will occur in half of the unions — such will be simplex again. If one parent...
Page 16 - ... question. If this proves to be impracticable, then sterilization is necessary — where the life of the state is threatened extreme measures may and must be taken. Maniac-depressive insanity seems likewise due to a defect, in any case it is especially apt to occur in families in which both parental strains show the disease. I give a few cases. (A 2, 3.) While, on account of the complexity of nervous diseases, all of the children even of two neurotic parents are not always neurotic, the chances...
Page 5 - Meanwhile experience indicates that the marriage of alcoholists certainly and probably of users of any drug to extremes is associated with defective development of offspring and is, in so far, unfit. Also the class of cases in which, as in tuberculosis, a weakened person is quickly finished by the drain of reproductive processes bears on marriage fitness but does not belong to my topic in the narrow limits I assign it. For my topic deals rather with the result of union of two uninfected germ plasms...
Page 16 - The country owes it to itself as a matter of self-preservation that every imbecile of reproductive age should be held in such restraint that reproduction is out of the question.
Page 31 - ... the great strains of human protoplasm that are coursing through the country. Thus could be learned not only the method of heredity of human characteristics but we shall identify those lines which supply our families of great men: our 'Adamses, our Abbotts, our Beechers, our Blairs, and so on through the alphabet. We shall also learn whence come our 300,000 insane and feeble-minded, our 160,000 blind or deaf, the 2,000,000 that are annually cared for by our hospitals and homes, our 80,000 prisoners...
Page 14 - It is therefore exceedingly dangerous for a deaf person to marry a blood relative, no matter what the character or degree of the relationship may be, and no matter whether the relative is deaf or hearing, nor whether the deafness of either or both or neither of the parents is congenital, nor whether either or both or neither of them have other deaf relatives.

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