Europe, America, and Technology: Philosophical Perspectives

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P.T. Durbin
Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 31, 1991 - Philosophy - 264 pages
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As Europe moves toward 1992 and full economic unity, and as Eastern Europe tries to find its way in the new economic order, the United States hesitates. Will the new European economic order be good for the U.S. or not? Such a question is exacerbated by world-wide changes in the technological order, most evident in Japan's new techno-economic power. As might be expected, philosophers have been slow to come to grips with such issues, and lack of interest is compounded by different philosophical styles in different parts of the world. What this volume addresses is more a matter of conflicting styles than a substantive confrontation with the real-world issues. But there is some attempt to be concrete. The symposium on Ivan Illich - with contributions from philosophers and social critics at the Penns- vania State University, where Illich has taught for several years - may suggest the old cliche of Old World vs. New World. Illich's fulminations against technology are often dismissed by Americans as old-world-style prophecy, while Illich seems largely unknown in his native Europe. But Albert Borgmann, born in Germany though now settled in the U.S., shows that this old dichotomy is difficult to maintain in our technological world. Borgmann's focus is on urgent technological problems that have become almost painfully evident in both Europe and America.
 

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Contents

SPENCE Ivan Illichs H20 and the Waters
95
HANS LENK Ideology Technocracy and Knowledge Utilization
127
FRIEDRICH RAPP The Limited Promise of Technology
157
KRISTIN SHRADERFRECHETTE Adam Smith and Alma
175
LEONARD J WAKS Symposium on Education in Science
193
MICHAEL S PRTTCHARD STS Critical Thinking
217
LEONARD J WAKS STS Education and the Paradox of Green
247
INDEX
259
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