European Broadcasting Law and Policy

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 18, 2007 - Law
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European broadcasting policy has attracted attention from many disciplines because it has dual nature: cultural and commercial. This book offers a detailed treatment of European broadcasting law, set against an overview of policy in this area. In this respect the authors identify tensions within the EU polity as regards the appropriate level, purpose and mechanism of broadcast regulation. Key influences are problems of competence, the impact of changing technology and the consequences of increasing commercialisation. Furthermore, the focus of the analysis is on the practical implications of the legal framework on viewers, and the authors distinguish both between citizen and consumer and between the passive and active viewer. The underlying question is the extent to which those most in need of protection by regulation, given the purpose of broadcasting, are adequately protected.
 

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Contents

1Introduction 3
18
3Regulation and the viewer in a changing broadcasting
41
4Union competence
62
5European broadcasting policy
87
6Access 115
146
8Jurisdiction forum shopping and the race to
173
balancing the needs
194
Negative content regulation
218
quotas
243
Privatisation of sport and listed events
266
constraints on public service broadcasting
290
Conclusions
315
Appendix
329
Index
355
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Jackie Harrison is Professor in Law at the University of Essex.

Lorna Woods is Professor of Public Communication at the University of Sheffield.

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