European and Japanese Gardens: Papers Read Before the American Institute of Architects ...

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H.T. Coates & Company, 1902 - Formal gardens - 162 pages
 

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Page 29 - Each has in a measure been adopted in the landscape gardening of other countries, but rarely are all four elements combined as they are in Italy. On the other hand, the Italian gardener rarely or never employs the vast levels and long vistas of French gardening, while, in the treatment of water, he avoids the massive and lofty jets and immense basins which distinguish the gardens of Versailles. Toward the sloping lawns and meandering paths of English and American grounds he feels much as the Frenchman...
Page 35 - ... charming surroundings and the obviousness of their role, not as works valuable intrinsically, but as mere adjuncts and features in the general scenic effect of the whole. Thirdly, the treatment of water \n the fountains, cascades and basins of these gardens exemplifies sound principles correctly applied. A very small volume of water is made to produce a maximum of decorative effect, and the greatest possible variety of effects, by repeated interruptions and changes of its movement from the reservoir...
Page 103 - ... and more characteristic elements of a race are brought out in its art accomplishment. Du Cerceau, in commenting upon the undoubted influence which the taste of the Italians exercised over their northern neighbors, outlines the type which was common in both France and Italy. "Everywhere," he says," were great divisions with avenues of high trees, fences of hazel, and hedges of hawthorne. Long, trellised arbors, opening out at intervals into shady summer-houses, ideally arranged for scenes of gallantry,...
Page 79 - ... household and between individual rooms. The nurseries are apart ; the master's own rooms are apart ; the guest-rooms are apart ; and finally, except in suites of rooms used only for entertainment, the individual rooms are well divided from each other. This same principle underlies the garden plan. The place is considered as an outdoor house. The grounds are divided up according to their use, and each portion has its well-established boundaries. In a place of even an acre or two the first consideration...
Page 12 - ... screened by a thick growth of ivy, ferns and other evergreens, that one feels, more than sees, the antiquity of the place. By a singular coincidence no tree, no shrub, no flower, no bud that is not purely classic seems to be allowed to live in this magnificent domain. No flower is allowed to diversify the emerald green of the lawns, except the classic rose and violet, and to make the illusion more perfect, flocks of peacocks have selected the groves of this villa for their abode.
Page 112 - Palissy, whose work in other lines is his chief claim to renown, beyond the circles of those who have made a special study of the history of...

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