Reviewing Care Management for Older People

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Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 1996 - Social Science - 146 pages

'The book explores central issues such as power, group goals, and the effects of the environment. It uses as its reference base both the published literature and examples from case eight studies of groups run by people from different professional backgrounds... The discussion of the power relationship between different members of the group is particularly welcome: user empowerment has become a neglected area of concern in books on groupwork... For those new to the field, this is well worth a read.'

- Mental Health Today

'The book includes some insightful material on the need for greater flexibility in service provision. The book is valuable for pointing out how much more research and development is still required.'

- Age and Ageing

'This book should be of considerable interest to social and health practitioners and policy makers.'

- Ageing and Society

'The key question this text addresses is the appropriateness of community care for elderly people in this country in the 1990s and beyond... This is a book which provides a wealth of material drawn from analysis of research and practice. It seeks not primarily to provide answers, but to articulate the central questions which point the way to the future agenda for research.'

- Community Care

'This volume achieves two essential requirements of a worthwhile read - it is informative, and it makes you think. It is realistic, and well in touch with what is happening in the field. It expresses a range of doubts and concerns, but is nevertheless cautiously optimistic for the future, as long as resources are found.'

- Policy Studies

Care management for people with dementia has been the subject of much scrutiny since the introduction of the community care legislation. The development and implementation of several models of care management are discussed in this volume. Drawing together research to highlight the successes and the difficulties of translating the principles of care management into practice, it examines this subject with particular reference to: empowerment; needs-led assessment; and multi-disciplinary work.

The book investigates the extent to which care management, with its emphasis on user choice and participation can be successfully applied to older people and their carers, and identifies key areas for further research and development in the field.

 

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Contents

Reviewing The Literature On Care Management
1
Assessment And Care
14
MultiDisciplinary Assessment and Care Management
28
The Practitioners Perspective
40
Care Management and Dementia
60
User Choice Care Management and People with Dementia
71
Misunderstanding Verbal
79
Care
102
Ethnicity and Care Management
117
Developing Care Management
134
The Contributors
141
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Judith Phillips is a lecturer in the Department of Applied Social Studies of the University of Keele. Bridget Penhale is a lecturer in the Social Work Division of the University of Hull.

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