Evaluating Derivatives: Principles and Techniques of Algorithmic Differentiation, Second Edition

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SIAM, Nov 6, 2008 - Mathematics - 438 pages
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Algorithmic, or automatic, differentiation (AD) is a growing area of theoretical research and software development concerned with the accurate and efficient evaluation of derivatives for function evaluations given as computer programs. The resulting derivative values are useful for all scientific computations that are based on linear, quadratic, or higher order approximations to nonlinear scalar or vector functions. This second edition covers recent developments in applications and theory, including an elegant NP completeness argument and an introduction to scarcity. There is also added material on checkpointing and iterative differentiation. To improve readability the more detailed analysis of memory and complexity bounds has been relegated to separate, optional chapters. The book consists of: a stand-alone introduction to the fundamentals of AD and its software; a thorough treatment of methods for sparse problems; and final chapters on program-reversal schedules, higher derivatives, nonsmooth problems and iterative processes.
 

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Contents

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Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Andreas Griewank is a former senior scientist of Argonne National Laboratory and authored the first edition of this book in 2000. He holds a Ph.D. from the Australian National University and is currently Deputy Director of the Institute of Mathematics at Humboldt University Berlin and a member of the DFG Research Center Matheon, Mathematics for Key Technologies. His main research interests are nonlinear optimization and scientific computing.

Andrea Walther studied mathematics and economy at the University of Bayreuth. She holds a doctorate degree from the Technische Universitšt Dresden. Since 2003 Andrea Walther has been Juniorprofessor for the analysis and optimization of computer models at the Technische Universitšt Dresden. Her main research interests are scientific computing and nonlinear optimization.

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