Evangelicals at a Crossroads: Revivalism and Social Reform in Boston, 1860-1910

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UPNE, Jan 11, 2011 - Religion - 304 pages
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Benjamin L. Hartley brings to light the little-known story of relative latecomers to Boston's religious scene: Methodist, Salvation Army, Baptist, and nondenominational Christians. Focusing on Congregationalists and Roman Catholics, Boston urban historians have largely overlooked these groups. Hartley, however, sheds light on the role of immigrant evangelical leaders from Italy, Sweden, and elsewhere in revivalism and social reform in postbellum Boston. Further, examining the contested nature of revivalism and social reform in a particular, local nineteenth-century context provides a basis for understanding the roots of current divisions in American Protestantism and the contentious role of evangelical religion in American politics. Hartley documents the importance of the American holiness movement as a precursor to the significant presence of Pentecostal groups in urban America, adding an important historical context for evangelical social action today.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
D L Moody Arrives in a Changing Boston
15
The Early Years of Evangelical Institution Building 18581883
33
Evangelicals and Boston Politics
65
The Salvation Army and Other Evangelical Organizations Led by Women 18841892
93
Evangelical Consensus and Division
117
The North End and South End in the 1890s
137
The Most Marvelous Revival of All of Her History
165
Notes
181
Bibliography
255
Index
277
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

BENJAMIN L. HARTLEY is an associate professor at the Palmer Theological Seminary of Eastern University in Philadelphia.

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