Every Little Thing Gonna Be Alright: The Bob Marley Reader

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Hank Bordowitz
Da Capo Press, Jun 16, 2004 - Biography & Autobiography - 314 pages
1 Review
Throughout Africa, the Caribbean, Europe, and America, Bob Marley represents far more than just the musician who translated spiritual and political beliefs into hypnotic, hard-hitting songs such as "Get Up, Stand Up," "No Woman, No Cry," and "Jammin'." Marley was born in rural Jamaica and reared in the mean streets of Kingston's Trenchtown; his ascent to worldwide acclaim, first with The Wailers--Peter Tosh and Bunny Livingstone--and later as a solo artist, is a riveting story of the spiritual awakening of a uniquely talented individual.Now, for the first time, a symphony of voices has joined together to offer perspective on one of this century's most compelling figures. Dealing with Bob Marley as a man and myth, from his "rude boy" teens to international fame and his tragic death at the age of thirty-six, Every Little Thing Gonna Be Alright then explores the larger picture, examining Marley as the spokesman for Jamaica's homegrown religion of Rastafarianism, as a flash point for the pressure cooker of Jamaican politics, and his unique status as the first pop musical superstar of the so-called "Third World."
 

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Every little thing gonna be alright: the Bob Marley reader

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Bob Marley remains the most famous and influential reggae star, 23 years after his death. While he has been the subject of many traditional biographies, he hasn't inspired an anthology like this ... Read full review

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This book repeats the accusation by Harry Robinson that he produced the Heptones album Night Food and not me. Harry owned the studio where the album was recorded. It's not unusual for Jamaican label owners to take credit for producing and songwriting they did't do. It's easiest to clear up by asking the group. The Heptones have always acknowledged I produced Night Food. If you don't believe me, check group leader Leroy Sibbles own site: LeroySibbles.com. Harry was an old school Jamaican music entrepeneur who felt he had a right to take credit for anything he felt like. To further illustrate his questionable tactics: While there working on the Heptones album, I encountered top session musicians (Sly & Robbie and others) who claimed Harry would promise to pay them just $20JA per tune. Then he would add insult to injury by not paying them the $20. 

Contents

VI
2
VII
3
VIII
6
IX
12
X
18
XI
19
XII
36
XIII
43
XXXIV
200
XXXV
201
XXXVI
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XXXVII
216
XXXVIII
217
XXXIX
225
XL
231
XLI
232

XIV
46
XV
89
XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XLII
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XLIII
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XLIV
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XLV
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XLVI
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XLVII
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XLVIII
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XLIX
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L
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LI
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LII
279
LIII
285
LIV
291
LV
294
LVI
296
LVII
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LVIII
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About the author (2004)

Hank Bordowitz is the author of the critically acclaimed Bad Moon Rising: The Unauthorized History of Creedence Clearwater Revival and editor of The U2 Reader: A Quarter Century of Commentary, Criticism, and Reviews. He lives in the exurbs of New York City.

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