Every Woman Her Own Flower Gardener: A Handy Manual of Flower Gardening for Ladies

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H.T. Williams, 1874 - Floriculture - 148 pages
 

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Page 146 - Flowers seem intended for the solace of ordinary humanity : children love them ; quiet, tender, contented ordinary people love them as they grow ; luxurious and disorderly people rejoice in them gathered : They are the cottager's treasure ; and in the crowded town, mark, as with a little broken fragment of rainbow, the windows of the workers in whose heart rests the covenant of peace.
Page 77 - There is a lesson in each flower, A story in each stream and bower ; On every herb on which you tread Are written words which, rightly read, Will lead you from earth's fragrant sod To hope, and holiness, and God.
Page 147 - Our outward life requires them not — Then wherefore had they birth ? — : To minister delight to man, To beautify the earth ; To comfort man — to whisper hope, Whene'er his faith is dim, For who so careth for the flowers . Will much more care for him ! THE CARRION CROW.
Page 11 - I care not, Fortune, what you me deny: You cannot rob me of free Nature's grace: You cannot shut the windows of the sky, Through which Aurora shows her bright'ning face; You cannot bar my constant feet to trace The woods and lawns, by living stream, at eve: Let health my nerves and finer fibres brace, And I their toys to the great Children leave: Of fancy, reason, virtue, nought can me bereave.
Page 119 - E'en to faint age Thou lend'st the vernal bliss : — the old man's eye Falls on the kindling blossoms, and his soul Remembers youth and love, and hopefully Turns unto thee, who call'st earth's buried germs From dust to splendour ; as the mortal seed Shall, at thy summons, from the grave spring up To put on glory, to be girt with power, And filled with immortality.
Page 138 - Bring flowers to the shrine where we kneel in prayer, They are nature's offering, their place is there ! They speak of hope to the fainting heart, With a voice of promise they come and part, They sleep in dust through the wintry hours, They break forth in glory — bring flowers, bright flowers ! THE CRUSADER'S RETURN. "Alas! the mother that him bare, If she had been in presence there, In his wan cheeks and sunburnt hair She had not known her child.
Page 122 - ... was carried on by Nature; how utterly ignorant we were of the causes of the least and most disesteemed of the commonest vegetables; and what a quantity of life, and beauty, and mystery, and use, and enjoyment, was to be found in them, composed out of all sorts of elements, and shaped as if by the hands of fairies. What workmanship, with no apparent workman! What consummate elegance, though the result...
Page 119 - O Father, Lord ! The all-beneficent ! I bless thy name, That thou hast mantled the green earth with flowers, Linking our hearts to nature ! By the love Of their wild blossoms, our young footsteps first Into her deep recesses are beguiled, Her minster cells ; dark glen and forest bower, Where thrilling with its earliest sense of thee, Amidst the low religious whisperings And shivery...
Page 32 - The rest is all richness and simplicity united — which is the triumph of an intense perception. Embower a cottage thickly and completely with nothing but roses, and nobody would desire the interference of another plant.
Page 11 - I care not, fortune, what you me deny : You cannot rob me of free nature's grace ; You cannot shut the windows of the sky, Through which Aurora shows her brightening face : You cannot bar my constant feet to trace The woods and lawns by living stream at eve. Let health my nerves and finer fibres brace, And I their toys to the great children leave : Of fancy, reason, virtue, nought can me bereave.

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