Everyday Law for Seniors

Front Cover
Paradigm Publishers, 2010 - Law - 189 pages
0 Reviews
Seniors are a wide ranging and exponentially growing special status group that the law treats differentially with respect to rights, responsibilities, and benefits. This book is written to inform and assist seniors and those who care for them. The topics covered range from retirement strategies, housing options, and long-term care to federal benefit programs such as Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid, and ultimately, to end of life decisions.

Whether you are someone looking out for your parents; a new retiree concerned about your legal rights; or one of the growing number of "old old" eighty-five years or older who needs answers to confusing legal issues, this book provides essential information in clear language about timely topics such as reverse mortgages, long-term care insurance, powers of attorney, guardianship, and the hidden problem of elder abuse. Each chapter includes "Did You Know?" opening outlines as well as web-based resources for additional information.

The authors are nationally known elder law experts and are frequently asked to consult with national commissions, legislatures, bar associations, and individuals from every walk of life. In Everyday Law for Seniors, they provide advice appropriate for everyone, senior or not (yet).

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

Everyday Law for Seniors

User Review  - Joan Pedzich - Book Verdict

Frolik and Whitton, expert attorneys of elder law, tackle the complex array of laws pertaining to senior citizens' rights and obligations. They begin with a discussion of who is a senior citizen and ... Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgments
1
Age Discrimination in Employment
13
Social Security and Supplemental Security Income
25
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Lawrence A. Frolik is Professor of Law at University of Pittsburgh School of Law. Linda S. Whitton, Professor of Law at Valparaiso University School of Law, is the Reporter for the Uniform Power of Attorney Act. She is a Commissioner of the American Bar Association Commission on Law and Aging, an ABA representative to the National Conference of Lawyers and Corporate Fiduciaries, and a Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. She is a past Council Member of the American Bar Association Section of Real Property, Trust and Estate Law, and a past Chair of the Association of American Law Schools Section on Aging and the Law. Professor Whitton teaches courses in elder law and property and frequently speaks and publishes on a variety of elder law topics.

Bibliographic information